food

Host Poppy Tooker and 2016 Oyster Shucking Champion Jay Gallet
Reggie Morris

On this week’s show, we set out to prove that oysters can — and should — be enjoyed year-round. We’re going behind the scenes to get a better understanding of how those salty bivalves go from farm to table. 

 

Angelo Brocato's neon sign on N. Carrollton Avenue has been a neighborhood fixture since the late 1970's.
b. rox / Infrogmation/Flickr

The next time you’re strolling the French Quarter, look for some ceramic tiling in front of 615 Ursuline Street. That tiling spells out ‘Angelo Brocato’, who New Orleanians know as the namesake of an old-world gelateria that used to be located there.

The business moved out of the neighborhood when it gentrified in the 70’s, but remains iconic to locals. So how’d it survive the transition? We turn to Arthur Brocato for that story and other family secrets. 

A spread of traditional Vietnamese dishes at the original Pho Tau Bay, which has now relocated to Tulane Avenue in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Vietnamese banh mi is now bar food, spring rolls are a festival snack and many neighborhoods across the city have not just their own outpost for pho but competing options. It’s never been easier to find Vietnamese food in New Orleans.

And yet, for the past year plus, I heard audible yearning for the return of one particular Vietnamese restaurant, Pho Tau Bay.

David Barbeau and Isaac Toups of Toups Meatery
Toups Meatery

Isaac Toups was born and raised in Rayne, La., outside of Lafayette. He garnered national fame this year when he made it to the second-to-last round on the reality cooking show Top Chef.

 


The Pontchartrain Hotel is a St. Charles Avenue landmark that recently reopened in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

In New Orleans these days, some restaurants aren't just up against all the other eateries in town. Some revived historic restaurants are also up against idealized memories of themselves that live on in the city's long memory.

Host Poppy Tooker and Pizza Delicious co-owner Michael Friedman at the Bywater hot spot.
Joe Shriner

The Louisiana restaurant scene has never been hotter. On this week's show, we're touring some special eateries that should be on your radar.

Roux Carre, a new food court from a local nonprofit in Central City.
Ian McNulty

Roux Carre is a new food court in Central City, conceived and managed by the nonprofit Good Work Network as a project to help more women and minorities stake a claim in the growing New Orleans restaurant sector.

Jenn Lormond, Betty Archote and Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

It would be hard to find anybody in America who doesn’t know that there’s a link between diet and health. It would, however, be no problem to find a hundred people on your street who want to eat healthier but don’t. Our usual excuses are -- healthy food is harder to find, it’s expensive, and it doesn’t taste good.

Jenn Lormond and Betty Archote share a healthy lunch and some enlightening conversation with Peter Ricchiuti on this edition of Out to Lunch.

On the grounds of Whitney Plantation. Former slave quarters are on the right with Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall visible in the background.
Sarah Holtz

In this special edition of Louisiana Eats, we celebrate the 151st anniversary of Juneteenth — the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

"The bomb," a sepecialty po-boy at Guy's Po-Boys in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Guy’s Po-boys was closed for months earlier this year after a vehicle plowed through its front door late one night. Guy’s is back open now, but a group of fellow po-boy purveyors decided to hold a fundraiser to support its proprietor after losing out on so much business during the repairs. It will be a street party with a purpose, powered by po-boys.

See details below:

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