food

Roux Carre, a new food court from a local nonprofit in Central City.
Ian McNulty

Roux Carre is a new food court in Central City, conceived and managed by the nonprofit Good Work Network as a project to help more women and minorities stake a claim in the growing New Orleans restaurant sector.

Jenn Lormond, Betty Archote and Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

It would be hard to find anybody in America who doesn’t know that there’s a link between diet and health. It would, however, be no problem to find a hundred people on your street who want to eat healthier but don’t. Our usual excuses are -- healthy food is harder to find, it’s expensive, and it doesn’t taste good.

Jenn Lormond and Betty Archote share a healthy lunch and some enlightening conversation with Peter Ricchiuti on this edition of Out to Lunch.

On the grounds of Whitney Plantation. Former slave quarters are on the right with Allées Gwendolyn Midlo Hall visible in the background.
Sarah Holtz

In this special edition of Louisiana Eats, we celebrate the 151st anniversary of Juneteenth — the day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States.

"The bomb," a sepecialty po-boy at Guy's Po-Boys in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Guy’s Po-boys was closed for months earlier this year after a vehicle plowed through its front door late one night. Guy’s is back open now, but a group of fellow po-boy purveyors decided to hold a fundraiser to support its proprietor after losing out on so much business during the repairs. It will be a street party with a purpose, powered by po-boys.

See details below:

Host Poppy Tooker with NPR's Kitchen Sisters Davia Nelson, left, and Nikki Silva, right.
Joe Shriner

On this week's show, we take a journey in sound with two radio luminaries, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, also known as The Kitchen Sisters.

Davia and Nikki visit our kitchen at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum to discuss their amazing trajectory on NPR as well as how they came to uncover Hidden Kitchens, their duPont-Columbia Award-winning series.

The name Creole tomato can turn heads in the market place this time of year.
Ian McNulty

This time of year, if you haven’t seen a Creole tomato it’s probably right behind you.

Summer is revving up, so these ultra-seasonal beauties are everywhere, big red orbs tumbling from bins at farmers markets and fruit stands and grocery stores.

Eat Local Challenge

In the weeks ahead, you may start seeing a different side of local food, one that might include the innovative, the overlooked or underutilized, and even the invasive.

Host Poppy Tooker and Ryan Chetiyawardana, better known as Mr. Lyan. He has received multiple awards for his innovations behind the bar, including being named International Bartender of the Year in 2015 at Tales of the Cocktail.
Joe Shriner

On this week's show, we're traveling to three continents for a fresh look at business innovation.

The bar at Tujague's Restaurant, a New Orleans restaurant marking its 160th anniversary.
Ian McNulty

Give any restaurant enough time and an institutional history will accrue. Give it as much time as Tujague's has on the clock, and it can develop its own lore and legends and even some dichotomies that might seem like contradictions but end up defining the place.

Students participating in NOCCA's Culinary Arts program.
Elizabeth McMillan

On this week's show, we go back to school for no ordinary education. We take an in-depth look at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA) and their flourishing Culinary Arts division — the only chef's training program offered at the high school level in the nation.

Pages