food

Host Poppy Tooker and French Truck Coffee owner Geoffrey Meeker
Reggie Morris

 

On this week’s show, we’re taking a look at the coffee and tea scene across Louisiana.

 

We begin with Geoffrey Meeker, owner of French Truck Coffee. It took only one cup of coffee from San Francisco to inspire him to become a New Orleans coffee purveyor. Now, Geoffrey and his team are at the vanguard of what many are calling the third wave coffee movement.

Smoot's Grocery owner Dub Rogers
Poppy Tooker

 

On this week's show, we're celebrating the tricentennial of Natchez, Mississippi. We'll visit our neighbors across the river and learn how residents are combining history and innovation to make Natchez a singular destination.

Chicken and beer on this week's edition of Out to Lunch.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you had to name the biggest fried chicken business in Louisiana, you probably wouldn’t have to think about it too long. You might take a bit longer to name the next biggest. And even then you might not come up with Krispy Krunchy. Krispy Krunchy’s executive Vice President Dan Shapiro is Peter's guest on this edition of Out to Lunch.

What’s fried chicken without a beer? Peter's other guest on today’s show is Michael Naquin, founder of 40 Arpent Brewing Company.

Bao, or Chinese steamed buns, anchor the menu of traditional dishes at Bao & Noodle in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

The meal started with a sticky cluster of peanuts spiked with chiles that temporarily numbed the tongue. There was a salad that had the crunch of fresh-cut slaw and brought a bona fide caffeinated buzz from bits of fermented tea leaves strewn throughout.

Poppy Tooker and Kate Gerwin
Joe Shriner

It's that magical time of year in New Orleans when cocktailians and spirits experts from around the world come together in the blazing heat for the world's pre-eminent cocktail festival, Tales of the Cocktail. On this week's show, we're giving you an insider's view into the Crescent City’s most spirited gathering. 

Poppy Tooker

On this week’s show, we’re inviting you to a midsummer barbecue for the ages! We’re traveling through country pithouses and urban kitchens in search of the best whole hog barbecue.

The New Orleans coffee house Rue de la Course once had nine locations around the city and a loyal, widespread fan base.
Ian McNulty

Do you remember your first beer? How about your first sip of wine? I don't. The first brush with those pleasures must've happened casually, something introduced with a taste here or there.

But, the first taste of New Orleans coffee? For me, that stands out very clearly.

Host Poppy Tooker and 2016 Oyster Shucking Champion Jay Gallet
Reggie Morris

On this week’s show, we set out to prove that oysters can — and should — be enjoyed year-round. We’re going behind the scenes to get a better understanding of how those salty bivalves go from farm to table. 

 

Angelo Brocato's neon sign on N. Carrollton Avenue has been a neighborhood fixture since the late 1970's.
b. rox / Infrogmation/Flickr

The next time you’re strolling the French Quarter, look for some ceramic tiling in front of 615 Ursuline Street. That tiling spells out ‘Angelo Brocato’, who New Orleanians know as the namesake of an old-world gelateria that used to be located there.

The business moved out of the neighborhood when it gentrified in the 70’s, but remains iconic to locals. So how’d it survive the transition? We turn to Arthur Brocato for that story and other family secrets. 

A spread of traditional Vietnamese dishes at the original Pho Tau Bay, which has now relocated to Tulane Avenue in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Vietnamese banh mi is now bar food, spring rolls are a festival snack and many neighborhoods across the city have not just their own outpost for pho but competing options. It’s never been easier to find Vietnamese food in New Orleans.

And yet, for the past year plus, I heard audible yearning for the return of one particular Vietnamese restaurant, Pho Tau Bay.

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