food

 

This week, we’re bringing you a special April Fools edition of Louisiana Eats! One of the stories in this hour is a joke, but the rest are so wild, you may not be able to separate the fact from the fiction!

We begin with zoologist and author Bill Schutt, whose new book focuses on the most taboo of topics: cannibalism. Bill gives us the full story on a truly humanist cuisine.

Jameson

Behind every cocktail bar and liquor cabinet is a wealth of history and elaborate effort. On this week’s show, we take a look at some hidden elements of the cocktail industry.

The fried seafood boat at Morton's Seafood in Madisonville.
Ian McNulty

The seafood boat is not a po-boy, and it’s different from a seafood platter. It belongs to its own niche. It flies brazenly in the face of modern low-carb diets, but survives at a handful of eateries. It can kindle cravings in those with a nostalgic bent, and maybe event those who enjoy a little spectacle with their supper.

Ian McNulty

Some of the city's old-guard restaurants hold heralded places in Carnival tradition, and king cakes have been glittering extra brightly lately as chefs and bakers around New Orleans put their own stamp on its form and flavors.   

But, when it comes to keeping people going through the long haul of Carnival, the heavy lifting often falls to much more humble fare from unsung suppliers. These are the grocery stores, the delis and the specialty caterers of New Orleans, businesses that work at fever pitch once the parade season reaches its prime time. 

Pat Fahey is the co-founder of AmeriPure.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

One of our favorite foods here in Louisiana is raw oysters. Oysters are also the favorite place to hang out for a couple of bacteria that are very unfriendly to human beings. Notwithstanding, nobody in Louisiana has gotten sick from a raw oyster in some time. The reason for that is a company called AmeriPure. AmeriPure kills the bad bacteria in oysters without affecting the oyster’s taste. Pat Fahey is the co-founder of AmeriPure.

On this week's show, we indulge our sweet tooth with the help of several influential dessert makers.

 

We begin with Anne Byrn, also known as "The Cake Mix Doctor," whose book American Cake takes readers back to the origins of baking in America. From birthday to wedding cake, Anne has the history behind each delicious layer.

It takes more than raw talent to become a successful chef. On this week’s show, we speak with culinary masters about the importance of mentorship in and out of the kitchen.

 

We begin with Chefs Aarón Sánchez and John Besh, who discuss how their scholarship programs aim to help aspiring young cooks, and the essential role mentorship has played in their own lives.

Host Poppy Tooker and spice blender Lior Lev Sercarz
Joe Shriner

On this week's show, we’re getting an aromatic education in herbs and spices. 

 

First, we speak with Lior Lev Sercarz, a chef, spice blender, and owner of La Boîte in New York City. Lior discusses his career's trajectory from sergeant of the Israeli army to spice master, and explains why he believes both home cooks and professional chefs will benefit from delving into spices.

King cakes have become a popular cultural icon in New Orleans, though some still look for the satisfaction of an old classic style.
Ian McNulty

King cakes have been popular in New Orleans for a long time. But not this popular. Something has changed.

King cake has become a cultural statement, one of those emblems of pride that New Orleans uses to celebrate itself. King cake is the Saints fleur-de-lis of food. You live it, you wear it, you rally around it.

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