food

A dark roux, country style chicken and andouille gumbo from Brocato's Catering in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

No dish in New Orleans is more Creole than gumbo. And, appropriately enough for that Creole identity, there’s no single answer to just how it should taste and what can go into the pot.

This has been on my mind because this weekend a veritable dream team of New Orleans Creole eateries will serve more than a dozen versions of gumbo at the Treme Creole Gumbo Festival (see full details below).

Out to Lunch, with Peter Ricchiuti.
Sam Weil / It's New Orleans

Have you been to Costco? Or Trader Joes? Or Whole Foods? Or any of the who-knows-how-many other grocery stores in New Orleans? Have you noticed that any time you go, every store always seems busy. There’s no doubt that here in New Orleans we have a love affair with grocery shopping. We even have our own unique name for it – making groceries.

On this edition of Out to Lunch we’re talking about making groceries from two very different perspectives.

Host Poppy Tooker with JoAnn Clevenger
Reggie Morris

On this week's show, we speak with some powerful and influential women in the food industry who are getting the job done.

We begin with local treasure JoAnn Clevenger, restaurateur behind the Upperline. While she is most famous for her Uptown restaurant, JoAnn has worn many different hats over her lifetime, managing multiple businesses with pluck and determination.

Ian McNulty

In New Orleans, there’s long been a natural order when it comes to enjoying a bit of natural beauty with your dinner and drinks. It was the courtyards of old French Quarter restaurants or a seat by the flaming fountain at Pat O’Brien’s. Watching streetcars rattle past from the porch at the Columns Hotel always qualified, and any balcony was fair game. 

But now the game has changed, and here’s the latest twist: more restaurants and bars are going the full monty, devoting most of their space and much of their business model to the al fresco appeal.

University Press of Mississippi / University Press of Mississippi

It’s Halloween, and there’s no place better in the world to celebrate All Hallow’s Eve than in the the ghost laden state of Louisiana!

To get you in the spirit, on this week’s show, we tour the cities of the dead, learning tombside all about our dearly departed culinary legends from Sally Asher, author of Stories From the Saint Louis Cemetaries of New Orleans.

The new Saturday location of the Crescent City Farmers Market is at 750 Carondelet St.
Ian McNulty

Around the world, you find farmers markets in historic halls of iron and glass and in leafy, bucolic town squares.

For 21 years, we found the Saturday version of the Crescent City Farmers Market in a small corner parking lot in downtown New Orleans. Normally it was a utilitarian space. But for one day each week it came alive, animated by the energy of people and food and hand-to-hand commerce. 

Well now, the Crescent City Farmers Market is out to create that organic ambiance all over again at a new location. That’s because the Saturday market has moved to corner of Carondelet and Julia streets in downtown New Orleans.

Breakfast at the Original Ruby Slipper Cafe
Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons


On this week's show, we're up at the crack at dawn to examine what many consider to be the most important meal of the day: breakfast.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

The first ever Beignet Fest is coming to Lafayette Square on October 8, and apart from gourmet beignets and great music, the festival’s cause provides even one more reason to come out and spread the powdered sugar. Founders Amy and Sherwood Collins started the festival as a way to support programs for individuals on the autism spectrum.

Sherwood joins NolaVie’s Brian Friedman in the studio for a behind-the-scenes look at Beignet Fest 2016.  

 Bob Engel, Chef Liaison of Gourmet Mushrooms, shows off a bottle filled with sawdust and mycelium while giving a tour of the farm.
Terry McCarthy

On this week's show, we're looking at farming across the state and the Americas.

We begin on the West Coast, with a tour of Gourmet Mushrooms in Sonoma County, California, where they are mimicking natural growing conditions to cultivate specialty mushrooms indoors. This farm harvests eight different varieties of organic mushrooms for food wholesalers, gourmet grocers, and restaurants all across America.

The Sweet Success Of Bananas Foster Has An Unsavory Past

Sep 30, 2016

There's more to the story of Bananas Foster than flambeed fruit. While the enticing dessert is a sweet legacy of New Orleans' once-booming banana trade, there's also a less savory one: banana republics.

Today, the banana is America's favorite fruit, but it was once considered exotic. The fruit only became commonplace in the United States starting in the 1870s, thanks to improvements in shipping and botany. By the turn of the century, the banana trade was a million-dollar industry.

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