The new Saturday location of the Crescent City Farmers Market is at 750 Carondelet St.
Ian McNulty

Around the world, you find farmers markets in historic halls of iron and glass and in leafy, bucolic town squares.

For 21 years, we found the Saturday version of the Crescent City Farmers Market in a small corner parking lot in downtown New Orleans. Normally it was a utilitarian space. But for one day each week it came alive, animated by the energy of people and food and hand-to-hand commerce. 

Well now, the Crescent City Farmers Market is out to create that organic ambiance all over again at a new location. That’s because the Saturday market has moved to corner of Carondelet and Julia streets in downtown New Orleans.

Breakfast at the Original Ruby Slipper Cafe
Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

On this week's show, we're up at the crack at dawn to examine what many consider to be the most important meal of the day: breakfast.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

The first ever Beignet Fest is coming to Lafayette Square on October 8, and apart from gourmet beignets and great music, the festival’s cause provides even one more reason to come out and spread the powdered sugar. Founders Amy and Sherwood Collins started the festival as a way to support programs for individuals on the autism spectrum.

Sherwood joins NolaVie’s Brian Friedman in the studio for a behind-the-scenes look at Beignet Fest 2016.  

 Bob Engel, Chef Liaison of Gourmet Mushrooms, shows off a bottle filled with sawdust and mycelium while giving a tour of the farm.
Terry McCarthy

On this week's show, we're looking at farming across the state and the Americas.

We begin on the West Coast, with a tour of Gourmet Mushrooms in Sonoma County, California, where they are mimicking natural growing conditions to cultivate specialty mushrooms indoors. This farm harvests eight different varieties of organic mushrooms for food wholesalers, gourmet grocers, and restaurants all across America.

The Sweet Success Of Bananas Foster Has An Unsavory Past

Sep 30, 2016

There's more to the story of Bananas Foster than flambeed fruit. While the enticing dessert is a sweet legacy of New Orleans' once-booming banana trade, there's also a less savory one: banana republics.

Today, the banana is America's favorite fruit, but it was once considered exotic. The fruit only became commonplace in the United States starting in the 1870s, thanks to improvements in shipping and botany. By the turn of the century, the banana trade was a million-dollar industry.

One night recently at Commander's Palace the two reigning queens of New Orleans cuisine shared a table and, for a moment, the spotlight. It got me thinking about the long game, one so long we can't even see it amid the hubbub of what's new, who's ranked where, and which spot is getting all the attention. It got me thinking about the future, and who’s next.

Perhaps nothing tells the story of a kitchen better than the objects that live in it. On this week’s show, we’re bringing in a panel of experts for an education on culinary antiques and collectibles.

Fried chicken from McHardy's Chicken & Fixin' in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Fried chicken gets people fired up, and I don’t just mean hungry. But why? I’ve done some digging, and some digging in, and I’ve found a few reasons, beyond the simple fact that it’s delicious.

The timing is important. Fried chicken is top of mind in New Orleans right now because this Sunday, Sept. 25, the new Fried Chicken Festival debuts downtown, in Lafayette Square. 

A smoked brisket sandwich from the butcher shop Cleaver & Co. in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Back in the day, neighborhoods had their own butcher, their own baker and, well, maybe not their own candlestick maker, but at least other purveyors who were masters of their trades. You get the point.           

Today, butcher shops are making a comeback in New Orleans. But while the old butcher shop techniques are often the same, the way this next generation courts customers has changed. They’re finding new ways to introduce the prospect of a full butcher’s case to a clientele that may have been raised on supermarket staples and processed products.

Out to Lunch, with Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

For a long time in New Orleans, if you wanted to eat healthy, you could eat at home. Although that sounds like a joke, it was pretty close to the truth. If you were eating out and wanted a salad, you’d be lucky to find anything other than a pedestrian appetizer.

Today, things are looking brighter for the healthy eater.