food

The Pool Room at the former Four Seasons Restaurant in New York City.
George Geslin / Wikimedia Commons

On this week’s show, we take an in-depth look the evolution of restaurant dining in the America and speak with the co-owner of one the nation's top restaurants.

Pigs graze in forests on Mahaffey Farms in Princeton, Louisiana.
Poppy Tooker

On this week's show, we hit the road to tour a variety of farms that do everything from growing fresh produce to raising colonies of honeybees. We begin with a tour of Mahaffey Farms in Princeton, Louisiana, where Evan McCommon has been converting his family's timber ranch into a biodiverse farm. The changes have been slow, but his resolve steady as the 1,100 acres change from a dense forest to an open savannah.

Poppy & Chef John Besh
Reggie Morris / Louisiana Eats!

On this week's show, we look at the role food television plays in the lives of several chefs here in New Orleans. 

We begin with one of the youngest stars of food TV, Kaj Hecht, the recent winner of Chopped Junior. To get an understanding of how the 10-year-old New Orleans local came to be a contestant on the program, we invited Kaj and his father Michael into our studio.

 

This week, we’re bringing you a special April Fools edition of Louisiana Eats! One of the stories in this hour is a joke, but the rest are so wild, you may not be able to separate the fact from the fiction!

We begin with zoologist and author Bill Schutt, whose new book focuses on the most taboo of topics: cannibalism. Bill gives us the full story on a truly humanist cuisine.

Jameson

Behind every cocktail bar and liquor cabinet is a wealth of history and elaborate effort. On this week’s show, we take a look at some hidden elements of the cocktail industry.

The fried seafood boat at Morton's Seafood in Madisonville.
Ian McNulty

The seafood boat is not a po-boy, and it’s different from a seafood platter. It belongs to its own niche. It flies brazenly in the face of modern low-carb diets, but survives at a handful of eateries. It can kindle cravings in those with a nostalgic bent, and maybe event those who enjoy a little spectacle with their supper.

Ian McNulty

Some of the city's old-guard restaurants hold heralded places in Carnival tradition, and king cakes have been glittering extra brightly lately as chefs and bakers around New Orleans put their own stamp on its form and flavors.   

But, when it comes to keeping people going through the long haul of Carnival, the heavy lifting often falls to much more humble fare from unsung suppliers. These are the grocery stores, the delis and the specialty caterers of New Orleans, businesses that work at fever pitch once the parade season reaches its prime time. 

Pat Fahey is the co-founder of AmeriPure.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

One of our favorite foods here in Louisiana is raw oysters. Oysters are also the favorite place to hang out for a couple of bacteria that are very unfriendly to human beings. Notwithstanding, nobody in Louisiana has gotten sick from a raw oyster in some time. The reason for that is a company called AmeriPure. AmeriPure kills the bad bacteria in oysters without affecting the oyster’s taste. Pat Fahey is the co-founder of AmeriPure.

On this week's show, we indulge our sweet tooth with the help of several influential dessert makers.

 

We begin with Anne Byrn, also known as "The Cake Mix Doctor," whose book American Cake takes readers back to the origins of baking in America. From birthday to wedding cake, Anne has the history behind each delicious layer.

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