Food

A smoked brisket sandwich from the butcher shop Cleaver & Co. in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Back in the day, neighborhoods had their own butcher, their own baker and, well, maybe not their own candlestick maker, but at least other purveyors who were masters of their trades. You get the point.           

Today, butcher shops are making a comeback in New Orleans. But while the old butcher shop techniques are often the same, the way this next generation courts customers has changed. They’re finding new ways to introduce the prospect of a full butcher’s case to a clientele that may have been raised on supermarket staples and processed products.

On this week's show, we celebrate Commander's Palace and its visionary matriarch Ella Brennan, whose highly-anticipated memoir is coming out next week.

A spread of charcuterie made from seafood at Kingfish, a Cajun restaurant in the French Quarter.
Ian McNulty

Prosciutto and salami, pate and terrines, tasso and jerky and cracklin’. These are the staples of meat boards and charcuterie platters now so popular in the restaurant world. But lately, we're also finding seafood versions of all of this, often presented together as creative seafood charcuterie spreads.

Jerk chicken from Coco Hut, a Caribbean restaurant in New Orleans with a bold way with spice.
Ian McNulty

Keeping some semblance of cool as our summer heat rages on can take some strategy. We park the car under oak limbs and walk on the shady side of the street. We keep ice water handy and, when it's time to eat, something cool and light sounds like just the thing.

But across the spectrum, there is another way, and it’s to embrace the heat, to own it. Revel in fiery foods and you may just beat the heat at its own game.

Osayi Endolyn meets Hoppin' John

Aug 30, 2016
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Andrew Thomas Lee

Osayi Endolyn tells guest host Francis Lam about her introduction to Hoppin' John, and how that connected her to both her personal history and to the influence of African cuisine on the food of the American South.

Francis Lam: I want to start at the beginning of your story. There's this moment where you're working at a fine-dining, modern Southern restaurant, and you come upon a traditional Southern dish that you'd never heard of before, but it reminded you of some of the Nigerian food that you grew up with. Tell us about that moment.

Tasting the Impossible Burger

Aug 30, 2016
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The Impossible Burger (Photo: Impossible Foods)

A Stanford biochemist has created the Impossible Burger, a plant-based burger that has the aroma and texture of a cow-based patty. Bon Appétit's Kurt Soller sampled it, and he tells Francis Lam what he learned and how it tastes.

Other People's Food and the Greensboro Four

Aug 29, 2016
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Joseph McNeil and Dan Pashman (Photo credit: Anne Saini)

The Sporkful's Dan Pashman has started Other People's Food, a podcast that uses the universality of food to find common ground amid racial and cultural differences. On a recent episode, he spoke with the Greensboro Four's Joseph McNeil, who successfully broke the color barrier at a North Carolina Woolworth's in 1960. Dan shares this conversation with Splendid Table contributor Melissa Clark.

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The Splendid Table

Chef Jacques Pépin talks with guest host Francis Lam about why roast chicken is so iconic for French chefs, the importance of technique, and what he cooks at home.

Francis Lam: I noticed in your new book, the very first recipe is for a simple roast chicken: no brining, no spicing, just a hot pan and a hot oven. So, let me ask you, why is a simple roast chicken such an iconic dish for French chefs?

The little Red Hen finds a seed to plant
Florence White Williams - The Little Red Hen: An Old English Folk Tale / Project Gutenberg

Cooking For The Young And Young At Heart

With the proliferation of kid’s cookbooks and cooking shows these days, it’s evident that the kitchen is increasingly becoming the favorite playground of many a child. This week’s show is dedicated to the budding chefs of tomorrow and everyone who is young at heart.

Louisiana's love of gathering around food can be a tool to help people rebuild from disasters
Ian McNulty

When everything is torn apart, we gravitate to what brings us together. In Louisiana for all the hardships we’ve seen on the ragged edge of that equation, we’re fortunate to be so strong on the other side. Our shared food culture is one of those anchors.           
 

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