Food

Poppy Tooker and Kate Gerwin
Joe Shriner

It's that magical time of year in New Orleans when cocktailians and spirits experts from around the world come together in the blazing heat for the world's pre-eminent cocktail festival, Tales of the Cocktail. On this week's show, we're giving you an insider's view into the Crescent City’s most spirited gathering. 

Poppy Tooker

On this week’s show, we’re inviting you to a midsummer barbecue for the ages! We’re traveling through country pithouses and urban kitchens in search of the best whole hog barbecue.

Steve Sando's heirloom beans

Jul 15, 2016
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What rare wines are to some, heirloom beans are to Rancho Gordo's Steve Sando. Lynne Rossetto Kasper talks to him about how he got his start, his favorite kinds of beans, and his "foolproof" method for preparing them.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper: So how did you get into beans?

The New Orleans coffee house Rue de la Course once had nine locations around the city and a loyal, widespread fan base.
Ian McNulty

Do you remember your first beer? How about your first sip of wine? I don't. The first brush with those pleasures must've happened casually, something introduced with a taste here or there.

But, the first taste of New Orleans coffee? For me, that stands out very clearly.

What you need to know about aperitivo

Jul 14, 2016
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Aperitivo is northern Italy's version of happy hour, only instead of half-priced beers and a sketchy taco bar, light drinks and small plates carry the day. Marisa Huff writes about these cocktails and appetizers in the aptly-titled Aperitivo: The Cocktail Culture of Italy, and speaks with Splendid Table contributor Shauna Sever about them.

Shauna Sever: For the uninitiated, can you paint us a picture of this lovely Italian tradition of aperitivo?

The fundamental challenge of eggs

Jul 14, 2016
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Copyright 2016 America's Test Kitchen

Eggs are tricky. Molly Birnbaum, executive editor of Cook's Science for America's Test Kitchen, agrees, and says it all comes down to the white and the yolk. She tells Sally Swift how to best soft-boil an egg and shares a recipe for Runny Yolk Sauce.

[More from Birnbaum]

The memorable rosemary

Jul 13, 2016
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"Queen of Herbs" Jekka McVikar tells Lynne Rossetto Kasper about the memory and meal-enhancing properties of rosemary.

Lynne Rossetto Kasper: I have an herb that I've always really been attracted to, and I'd love to hear your take on it: rosemary.

Jekka McVicar: Rosemary is one of my absolute must-have herbs: Rosmarinus officinalis. It's just been proven to be as good as ginkgo at restoring your memory.

LRK: Really?

Jekka McVicar

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Krishnendu Ray (Photo credit: Maggie Tauranac)

Krishnendu Ray didn't learn to cook until he came to the U.S. from India. He quickly became fascinated with the subject, so much so that he's written The Ethnic Restaurateur, a history of immigrant food cultures in America.  He talks with Von Diaz about America's (very) gradual acceptance of new foods, the overwhelming skepticism even now-popular meals once faced, and the fate of the term "ethnic cuisine."

Host Poppy Tooker and 2016 Oyster Shucking Champion Jay Gallet
Reggie Morris

On this week’s show, we set out to prove that oysters can — and should — be enjoyed year-round. We’re going behind the scenes to get a better understanding of how those salty bivalves go from farm to table. 

 

A spread of traditional Vietnamese dishes at the original Pho Tau Bay, which has now relocated to Tulane Avenue in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Vietnamese banh mi is now bar food, spring rolls are a festival snack and many neighborhoods across the city have not just their own outpost for pho but competing options. It’s never been easier to find Vietnamese food in New Orleans.

And yet, for the past year plus, I heard audible yearning for the return of one particular Vietnamese restaurant, Pho Tau Bay.

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