flooding

Della Hasselle / WWNO

Extreme flooding caused major agricultural damage throughout South Louisiana in 2016. Now, struggling farmers are hoping to get help from a $10 million recovery grant approved by Congress this year.


National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Nate is heading to the Gulf Coast after killing 22 people in Central America. Forecasters say the storm will likely strike the Mississippi Delta around 7 p.m. as a Category 2 hurricane. Residents in several coastal parishes have been ordered to evacuate, and polling stations for early voting sites in some areas are closing ahead of schedule. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards is urging residents to find a safe place behind the flood wall as soon as possible and stay put until Sunday morning.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Floods this summer revealed that New Orleans’ drainage system hasn’t been working at full capacity. Since then, the city has been scrambling to improve the system in a number of ways — from repairing drainage pumps to clearing catch basins on the street.

 

This weekend, the city will teach citizens how to clean catch basins themselves. They’re calling it Adopt-A-Catch Basin.

 

Catch basins are those grated gutters on the sides of the road. When it rains, water flows through those grates before it’s pumped out of the city.

Molly Peterson / WWNO

Around the country, hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent to buy back individual homes from people who have flooded repeatedly. But buying out a whole neighborhood is uncommon. Louisiana's 2016 flood seems to be changing that for two communities. In Pointe Coupee and Ascension Parishes, a buyout program first used in neighborhoods after Superstorm Sandy may offer a new option to homeowners who have lived with escalating risk for decades.

With search and rescue efforts completed in the flooded parts of southwest Louisiana, Gov. John Bel Edwards says the state has now taken the lead on evacuating and sheltering people from the far corner of southeastern Texas.

Jim Bowie / Adobe Stock

Editor's Note: See the latest news and updates on Harvey.

As Louisiana braces for heavy rain from Tropical Storm Harvey, officials in New Orleans announced that one of the city’s drainage pumps is being repaired — after a motor caught fire Monday.

The announcement from Mayor Mitch Landrieu came after 4 inches of rain earlier in the day caused street flooding in neighborhoods across the city. 

www.nhc.noaa.gov

New Orleans is bracing for the heavy rains generated by Hurricane Harvey with a pumping system that is still not fully operational.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu held a press conference today, saying he's confident the pumps will handle the deluge. He says crews have been working 24-hours a day to repair pumps that failed during heavy rain earlier this month. Some neighborhoods sustained several feet of standing water. He says the system is now operating at 92 percent.

Travis Lux / WWNO

New Orleans is in a waiting game as the Gulf Coast braces for Hurricane Harvey to make landfall in Texas Friday night. City officials have not called for evacuations, but coastal parishes are under flood advisories. Vermillion Parish has called for voluntary evacuations and parts of Cameron Parish are under mandatory evacuation.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Under overcast skies, officials are urging caution, not panic, ahead of heavy weekend rains. The city has been on-edge since failures of the pumping system contributed to widespread flooding on Aug. 5.

Since then, some public officials have been fired— and some, but not all, of the pumps have been fixed.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu says the city remains vulnerable.

Kmusser / Creative Commons

Since rainfall blanketed southeast Louisiana in August 2016, residents have wondered how the state can protect its people from future floods. Answering that question begins with understanding the geography we live in.

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