flood protection

The Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans is getting a little greener. On Thursday night the Board unveiled seven green infrastructure projects it’s partnering on that aim to improve community outreach and participation in the city’s water management.

Jesse Hardman

Last week a delegation from the Crescent City traveled to Austin, Texas. The idea: to check out how Austin manages its water. Drought-stricken Texas has too little water; New Orleans often has too much. But they have a surprising amount to learn from each other.

A little-known state panel could have a big effect on the future of a lawsuit filed against the oil and gas industry last year by a south Louisiana flood board.

The nominating committee for the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East is set Thursday to nominate applicants for two people on the board whose terms have expired.

One is Paul Kemp, who supports the flood board's lawsuit seeking to hold oil and gas companies accountable for coastal damage.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

This week our coastal team is visiting the city of Austin, Texas with a group of New Orleans city officials, including City Council members Susan Guidry and LaToya Cantrell, and representatives from the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority and the Sewerage and Water Board.

The goal is to learn about how Austin manages its water system, and see if there’s some takeaways as the city of New Orleans tries to create a new water strategy that integrates old and new design.

Levee Board Lawsuit May Be Decided By Committee Selections

Aug 28, 2014

The future of the levee board lawsuit aimed at the oil and gas industry could be determined on Thursday.

The committee that nominates members for the south Louisiana flood control authority has two vacancies to fill.

The people it nominates could provide Governor Bobby Jindal with the votes he needs to kill a lawsuit against dozens of oil, gas and pipeline companies.

At today’s meeting, the nominating committee is expected to consider applicants to fill the expired term of Paul Kemp on the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

The Army Corps of Engineers is getting closer to completing new storm protection at the 17th Street, Orleans Avenue and London Avenue canals.

The $615 million system is scheduled to be done in less than three years. Its permanent structures will reduce risk of 100-year level storm surges in New Orleans.

Lieutenant Colonel Austin Appleton is the Army Corps Deputy Commander for the New Orleans District. “What this is doing is pushing the defense of the storm surge to the edge of the city," he says. "Prior, the defense was the interior walls of the canal.”

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The US Army Corps of Engineers says there is no major threat from debris found inside the 17th Street Canal levee.

Corps critics aren’t so sure.

Chunks of concrete, bricks and glass were discovered during work to install sheet piling.

The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection District—East has been assured by the Corps that the material is being removed.

Sandy Rosenthal founded Levees.org after the catastrophic levee breaches following Hurricane Katrina nine years ago.

Will Mississippi River Flooding Reach New Orleans?

Jul 7, 2014
USDA / Flickr

Water levels in the Mississippi River shot up in the past few weeks after a series of strong storms in the Midwest. Flooding has closed roads and bridges and swamped thousands of acres of farmland in Iowa, Illinois and Missouri.

But, will the flood waters affect us here in Louisiana?

Jeff Graschel, a Mississippi River-watcher with the National Weather Service, says that scenario is unlikely.

Louisiana State Museum

Each month Richard Campanella explores an aspect of New Orleans’ geography. His Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune shines a light on structural, often-overlooked or invisible aspects of the city. This month: a flood in 1849. Up until Katrina it was the largest deluge in the city’s history.

Campanella says that disaster 165 years ago had something in common with Katrina.

Federal Water Projects Bill Funds Levees And Flood Gates

Jun 10, 2014
Tobin / Wikimedia

Capping a rare instance of congressional compromise, President Barack Obama signed a $12.3 billion water projects bill Tuesday, financing improvements ranging from a harbor expansion in Boston to levees and flood control gates in Louisiana.

Obama singled out two of the bill's main negotiators for praise — Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer of California and Louisiana Republican Sen. David Vitter.

The new law will pay for 34 new projects over the next 10 years. Its price tag is half the amount of the last water projects bill seven years ago.

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