flood protection

Colonel Rick Hansen, commander of the Army Corps of Engineers New Orleans District,  says it’s time to open the Bonnet Carre Spillway in order to divert floodwaters and protect New Orleans.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

As the Mississippi and Red Rivers rise, officials are grappling with how to manage all of the water. The Army Corps of Engineers may open the Mississippi River’s Bonnet Carré Spillway this weekend.

New Orleans District Commander, Col. Rick Hansen, says it is time to open the spillway. Just west of the city, it diverts the Mississippi River to protect New Orleans.

Mississippi River flood stage predictions over the most recent, and next several, days.
National Weather Service

The National Weather Service has issued a flood warning for the Mississippi River in New Orleans and surrounding areas, effective January 12. This comes as floodwater from devastating winter rain in the Midwest makes its way south.

The river is expected to reach flood stage, 17 feet, in the next week. Rain is also in the forecast starting Wednesday night, adding to the risk of flooding. NWS warns not to drive cars through flooded areas.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

A new state study says land loss could cost Louisiana a lot of money if nothing is done. The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority commissioned the study, which was done by LSU and the RAND Corporation.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is settling up on how much it will pay to repair streets and sewer lines in New Orleans. Officials say much more than roadways can benefit.

Have a question about why your block floods? Or the state of our sewerage and water system? Regional plans for flood protection? What you can do to help make your neighborhood safer from flooding?

Join WWNO's Eve Troeh and experts for a community conversation this Saturday, November 7, at Sojourner Truth Community Center, 2200 Lafitte Ave. RSVP here and/or submit a question.

We'll hear from:

Jesse Hardman

Over the last decade more than $14 billion was spent to upgrade New Orleans’s storm protection system. But ask around, and you’ll get a variety of responses as to how safe the city actually is now when it comes to storms and flooding.

Mark Schleifstein is the Environment reporter for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. He’s been covering all facets of New Orleans’s attempts to shore up it’s natural and man-made defense systems.

St. Charles Parish Government

St Charles Parish officials hope to gain more control over their local wetlands by adopting their own coastal plan.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, is New Orleans better protected? The answer is complicated.

Historian John Barry says Louisiana’s new master plan for flood protection could help save the city, but it will cost billions of dollars and he wonders whether the political will exists to put it into place.

Barry says the plan faces several challenges, including sea level rise, due to land loss he says is caused in part by the energy industry, and the 100-year flood protection standard. He joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about it.

In the 10 years since Hurricane Katrina, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has nearly completed one of the world's most remarkable hurricane protection systems to encircle New Orleans. Locals say their low-lying city finally has the storm defenses it should have had before Katrina, which killed hundreds and caused billions in property losses.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

St. Bernard Parish officials want to raise awareness of how the parish was affected by Hurricane Katrina ten years ago. The parish is holding its own Katrina 10 events this week, featuring art displays, public banners indicating the level of water the area took, parish first response offices, and visits to Army Corps of Engineers flood protection projects.

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