flood protection

Latest News
7:21 am
Fri July 11, 2014

Debris Found In 17th Street Canal Levee

Workers pump cement slurry into the foundation of the 17th Street Canal in March 2011.
Credit U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The US Army Corps of Engineers says there is no major threat from debris found inside the 17th Street Canal levee.

Corps critics aren’t so sure.

Chunks of concrete, bricks and glass were discovered during work to install sheet piling.

The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection District—East has been assured by the Corps that the material is being removed.

Sandy Rosenthal founded Levees.org after the catastrophic levee breaches following Hurricane Katrina nine years ago.

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Latest News
5:34 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Will Mississippi River Flooding Reach New Orleans?

A flood gauge on the Mississippi River from the Louisiana side. Flooding in Missouri, Iowa and Illinois has closed roads and bridges in recent days.
USDA Flickr

Water levels in the Mississippi River shot up in the past few weeks after a series of strong storms in the Midwest. Flooding has closed roads and bridges and swamped thousands of acres of farmland in Iowa, Illinois and Missouri.

But, will the flood waters affect us here in Louisiana?

Jeff Graschel, a Mississippi River-watcher with the National Weather Service, says that scenario is unlikely.

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Features
7:51 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On New Orleans' Sauvé's Crevasse Flood Of 1849

New Orleans was inundated by Mississippi River waters in the spring of 1849. This oil painting by Elizabeth Lamoisse shows Canal Street at the time of the flood. "Landscape" by Elizabeth Lamoisse, 1848 - 1849, from the Louisiana State Museum.
Louisiana State Museum

Each month Richard Campanella explores an aspect of New Orleans’ geography. His Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune shines a light on structural, often-overlooked or invisible aspects of the city. This month: a flood in 1849. Up until Katrina it was the largest deluge in the city’s history.

Campanella says that disaster 165 years ago had something in common with Katrina.

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Latest News
5:13 pm
Tue June 10, 2014

Federal Water Projects Bill Funds Levees And Flood Gates

The Morganza flood control structure, part of the "Morganza to the Gulf" project funded by the Water Resources Development Act.
Tobin Wikimedia

Capping a rare instance of congressional compromise, President Barack Obama signed a $12.3 billion water projects bill Tuesday, financing improvements ranging from a harbor expansion in Boston to levees and flood control gates in Louisiana.

Obama singled out two of the bill's main negotiators for praise — Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer of California and Louisiana Republican Sen. David Vitter.

The new law will pay for 34 new projects over the next 10 years. Its price tag is half the amount of the last water projects bill seven years ago.

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The Lens
12:35 pm
Thu June 5, 2014

New Orleans Flood Protection: Stronger Than Ever, Weaker Than Intended

The city's new $14.5 billion storm surge protection system is weaker than what Congress ordered it to be 50 years ago.
US Army Corps of Engineers Wikimedia

The 2014 hurricane season has started, and New Orleans metro area residents are living behind a new, $14.5 billion storm surge system acknowledged as the best they have ever had. 

But an investigation by The Lens shows this best-ever is still not as good as Congress originally ordered it to be.

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Politics
1:25 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Battle Shaping Up Over 'Big Oil' Lawsuit Bill

Advocates of a south Louisiana flood control board's lawsuit against scores of oil and gas companies over erosion of coastal wetlands are making plans to fight legislation they say could undermine the suit.

Among other things, the bill filed for this year's legislative session would ensure Gov. Bobby Jindal's power to reject an independent committee's nominations for membership on the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East. Jindal opposes the lawsuit filed by the SLFPA-E last year.

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The Lens
5:00 am
Thu January 16, 2014

Flood Protection Authority Defends Oil And Gas Lawsuit In Baton Rouge

The Mississippi River Delta, and sediment from the rivers feeding into the Gulf of Mexico.
NASA

Attorneys for the Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority — East had a chance to defend their lawsuit against oil and gas companies, at a meeting of the state Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority on Wednesday in Baton Rouge.

The head of the state coastal authority, Garret Graves, has been one of the harshest critics of the lawsuit since it was filed last July. Governor Bobby Jindal has also been critical of the suit.

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The Lens
7:29 pm
Mon November 11, 2013

For Strengthening Levees, Bermuda Grass Is Hard To Beat

Bermuda grass is considered ideal grass for armoring local levees because its dense root mass holds soils and it grows well in the local climate.
Bob Marshall The Lens

The idea that grass can armor anything is hard to believe.

But on a recent visit to the Lake Pontchartrain levee, LSU agronomist Jeff Beasley explained how plain old, garden variety grass has earned a reputation with the US Army Corps of Engineers as one of the best armoring materials to keep the huge mud walls of a levee from collapsing during a storm.

"You know how we reinforce concrete with rebar?" says Beasley. "We can do the same with these levees."

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Latest News
9:04 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Jindal Names 3 To Levee Board That Sued Oil Companies

Gov. Bobby Jindal has named three new members to a Louisiana flood control board that filed a lawsuit against 97 oil and gas companies over damage to coastal wetlands.

Jindal had made clear that anyone who supported the suit would not be re-appointed to the nine-member Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East.

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Flood Control
7:00 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Major Construction Set To Begin On Lakefront Pumping Stations

Army Corps of Engineers personnel testing the temporary outflow canal pumps and surge gates in 2009.
Shannon Donner US Army Corps of Engineers

The US Army Corps of Engineers is ready to begin work on three new pumping stations.

Residents along the Lakefront are being advised to brace themselves for some major construction work. The Army Corps of Engineers is starting work on three permanent canal closures and pumps at 17th Street and Orleans and London Avenues.

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