flood protection

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The city of New Orleans just won an award for its efforts to adapt to climate change. The American Planning Association says the city’s resilience strategy sets a model for others dealing with the same challenges of rising seas and extreme weather. Coastal cities across the nation are trying to develop models like it, but there’s no dedicated federal money to do so.

After opening up the Bonnet Carre Spillway upriver of New Orleans on Sunday the Army Corps of Engineers has decided it won’t need to open the Morganza Spillway. The Corps issued a statement Monday, saying that based on current forecasts it won’t be necessary in order to relieve the swollen Mississippi River.

The Army Corps of Engineers used small cranes to slowly begin opening up the Bonnet Carre Spillway.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The Army Corps of Engineers opened the Bonnet Carré Spillway Sunday morning in order to relieve the swollen Mississippi River and prevent flooding in New Orleans.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Colonel Rick Hansen, commander of the Army Corps of Engineers New Orleans District,  says it’s time to open the Bonnet Carre Spillway in order to divert floodwaters and protect New Orleans.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

As the Mississippi and Red Rivers rise, officials are grappling with how to manage all of the water. The Army Corps of Engineers may open the Mississippi River’s Bonnet Carré Spillway this weekend.

New Orleans District Commander, Col. Rick Hansen, says it is time to open the spillway. Just west of the city, it diverts the Mississippi River to protect New Orleans.

Mississippi River flood stage predictions over the most recent, and next several, days.
National Weather Service

The National Weather Service has issued a flood warning for the Mississippi River in New Orleans and surrounding areas, effective January 12. This comes as floodwater from devastating winter rain in the Midwest makes its way south.

The river is expected to reach flood stage, 17 feet, in the next week. Rain is also in the forecast starting Wednesday night, adding to the risk of flooding. NWS warns not to drive cars through flooded areas.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

A new state study says land loss could cost Louisiana a lot of money if nothing is done. The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority commissioned the study, which was done by LSU and the RAND Corporation.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, the Federal Emergency Management Agency is settling up on how much it will pay to repair streets and sewer lines in New Orleans. Officials say much more than roadways can benefit.

Have a question about why your block floods? Or the state of our sewerage and water system? Regional plans for flood protection? What you can do to help make your neighborhood safer from flooding?

Join WWNO's Eve Troeh and experts for a community conversation this Saturday, November 7, at Sojourner Truth Community Center, 2200 Lafitte Ave. RSVP here and/or submit a question.

We'll hear from:

Jesse Hardman

Over the last decade more than $14 billion was spent to upgrade New Orleans’s storm protection system. But ask around, and you’ll get a variety of responses as to how safe the city actually is now when it comes to storms and flooding.

Mark Schleifstein is the Environment reporter for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. He’s been covering all facets of New Orleans’s attempts to shore up it’s natural and man-made defense systems.

Pages