fishing

WWNO

Five years after the BP spill, a look at the state of our local seafood industry from those who catch, study, sell and serve it.

Where: Southern Food and Beverage Museum, 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., New Orleans, Louisiana

When: Monday, April 13th, 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. (Arrive early to tour the museum before the discussion.)

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

There’s a new push to get tourists in New Orleans off Bourbon Street and into nature. Eco-tourism is the new way to explore Louisiana, according to a new statewide campaign. And as commercial fishermen are seeing numbers drop in catch and profit, they’re considering the tourism industry as a way to make a living.  

Aziz Saltik / Flickr

New restrictions are being placed on fishermen in the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic coast to protect the prized Bluefin tuna species from overfishing.

On Monday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced the rules, which affect commercial fishing vessels and take effect in January.

Under the new rules, fishermen will be barred from the practice of using miles-long fishing lines in areas of the Gulf of Mexico and off the coast of North Carolina during certain sensitive periods for Bluefin tuna.

Arpingstone / Wikimedia Commons

Over the weekend, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries launched its new Get Out and Fish! program in Lafayette’s Girard Park. A fishing competition and other family friendly activities all served to celebrate a new initiative to increase the number of people with access to quality fishing.

They say video killed the radio star. Mike Wood of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries says video games killed the fisherman.

Ian McNulty

Chefs and restaurateurs are increasingly joining efforts to promote sustainable Gulf seafood for reasons that unite the economy, the ecology and regional culture.  

Deyan Georgiev / Shutterstock.com

The oyster population along the Gulf Coast is dropping dramatically.

Thousands of beds are producing less than a third of the crop recorded before the BP oil spill four years ago.

Experts are now studying whether the spill is connected to the spill.

Oysters had been in trouble before the spill. They had been hit by hurricanes, overfishing and two straight years of damaging fresh water.

Allen Shimada / Wikimedia

Some studies have found a one in three chance that the fish on our restaurant plates or in the seafood case at the supermarket is mislabeled. A cheaper fish like tilapia may be sold as red snapper, for example.

Ian McNulty

Food writer Ian McNulty sits down for a meal of under-utilized seafood meant to showcase what diners might be missing in the bounty of the Gulf.

The prospect of an exotic dining experience may conjure the unfamiliar food traditions of far-off lands or ingredients too luxurious for everyday meals. But recently I sat down for an intriguingly original dinner built around seafood that is not only found close to home but is also routinely discarded as soon as it’s caught — or else chopped up as bait to catch other fish.

Extra Zebra

A leader in Alabama's charter fishing business says new federal limits on red snapper will hurt the state's industry.

The federal government has reduced this year's recreational snapper season in the Gulf of Mexico from 11 days to just nine days, starting June 1.

An arm of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration decided the change was needed because Louisiana opened its state waters year-round in April.

Crabby Taxonomist / flickr.com

They’re called bunker up north, and Pogies here in the South, and are sometimes referred to as “The Most Important Fish In the Sea”. These are the Menhaden.

Since it’s not a fish you eat, you’ve probably never heard of it. But the annual Menhaden Advisory Committee meeting was a big deal this year due to a new Menhaden management plan.

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