fishing

Listening Coast

This week on the Coastal New Roundup: how the state of Louisiana sometimes benefits from coastal erosion. Plus, an update on the fight over sediment diversions in Plaquemines Parish.

Travis Lux / WWNO

The Mississippi River has been flowing fast and high — and that’s meant the fishing has been good. But the river carries more than fish, water and dirt. It’s also a giant drainage basin for 40 percent of the country — and and picks up pollutants along the way.

 

If you fish from the Mississippi, is it safe to eat your catch? Are there any health concerns?

Travis Lux / WWNO

Last August, several days of heavy rain flooded the Baton Rouge area. From Baton Rouge to Denham Springs to Gonzales -- rising waters flooded out around one hundred thousand homes and caused billions of dollars worth of damage. Recovery is ongoing, even nine months later.

 

The Baton Rouge area isn’t the only part of the state still struggling this many months out. The damage rippled out across the state -- all the way down to the tiny town of Leeville, near Grand Isle, along the coast.

 

Royal Bream raises fish in a floating net in Marseille, France. This represents one type of farming technologies that could work in the Gulf.
NOAA, with permission from Giles Lemarchand.

Last month the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration opened the Gulf of Mexico for fish farming, or aquaculture. Now, some fishermen and environmentalists have filed a lawsuit against NOAA.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Most of the fish we eat in the U.S. comes from other countries. Fishermen in Louisiana have long sought to displace some of those imports but the industry has faced challenges like hurricanes and the 2010 BP oil spill.

Now, a new source of fish in the gulf offers promise -- but also raises questions.

Erik Christensen / wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Erik_Christensen

Soon companies will be able to farm fish in the Gulf of Mexico. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has opened federal waters to aquaculture.

WWNO

Five years after the BP spill, a look at the state of our local seafood industry from those who catch, study, sell and serve it.

Where: Southern Food and Beverage Museum, 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., New Orleans, Louisiana

When: Monday, April 13th, 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. (Arrive early to tour the museum before the discussion.)

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

There’s a new push to get tourists in New Orleans off Bourbon Street and into nature. Eco-tourism is the new way to explore Louisiana, according to a new statewide campaign. And as commercial fishermen are seeing numbers drop in catch and profit, they’re considering the tourism industry as a way to make a living.  

New Restrictions On Bluefin Tuna Fishing In The Gulf

Dec 1, 2014
Aziz Saltik / Flickr

New restrictions are being placed on fishermen in the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic coast to protect the prized Bluefin tuna species from overfishing.

On Monday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced the rules, which affect commercial fishing vessels and take effect in January.

Under the new rules, fishermen will be barred from the practice of using miles-long fishing lines in areas of the Gulf of Mexico and off the coast of North Carolina during certain sensitive periods for Bluefin tuna.

Arpingstone / Wikimedia Commons

Over the weekend, the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries launched its new Get Out and Fish! program in Lafayette’s Girard Park. A fishing competition and other family friendly activities all served to celebrate a new initiative to increase the number of people with access to quality fishing.

They say video killed the radio star. Mike Wood of the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries says video games killed the fisherman.

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