film industry

queenkv / Flickr

Legislation legalizing the sale of alcohol at more movie theaters won final passage Friday in the Louisiana legislature, the Times-Picayune reports.

Senate Bill 654 narrowly passed the House. It would allow movie theaters to obtain liquor licenses as long as the alcohol sales are separate from other concessions being sold.

It now heads to Governor Jindal for a signature to become law.

Five Louisiana movie theaters received their liquor permits prior to 1994, and already sell alcohol.

Anne Marie Fox

 

There was a moment for Robin Mathews two years ago, while she was spreading grits and cornmeal all over Matthew McConaughey’s face, when she thought, “This is either going to be the end of my career or the beginning of it.”

Fortunately, it turned out to be a major new beginning. Mathews’ work as makeup department head for the film Dallas Buyer’s Club earned the New Orleans native an Oscar nomination.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

The film business continues to grow so quickly that the term "Hollywood South" is becoming less of a quaint marketing moniker and more literally true with every movie that shoots here. Part of the reason for the growth is financial — state tax credits — and the other part is the crew and facilities now available here.

Hollywood South Casting Finds Local Talent, Anywhere

Dec 9, 2013
Allen Murabayashi

Thanks to today’s technology, we can now do many things without leaving the comfort of our homes.  That now includes becoming a movie star. Casting director James Bearb, founder and CEO of Hollywood South Casting discusses this evolving facet of the film industry.  

The new online animated short commercial for Chipotle Mexican Grill has gone viral -- more than 5 million YouTube views and counting. It has Shreveport creative firm Moonbot Studios to thank. Moonbot partner Brandon Oldenburg is surprised by how many people have checked it out.

“We’re abashed. We’re amazed by watching these numbers go up as far as the amount of views," Oldenburg said, during an interview at Moonbot's Shreveport office.

Twenty filmmakers have advanced in the Louisiana Film Prize contest vying for a $50,000 prize that will be handed out in October. It is the second year of the short film contest that is expected to draw 3,000 movie buffs to downtown Shreveport for the festival weekend.

Jim visits with Louisiana Lottery President Rose Hudson about frequent winners, recent changes to popular games and making millionaires in Louisiana.

Cleve Bailey talks with Jim about the Louisiana Film Industry and the new documentary he is working on about Trayvon Martin.


Organizers of the Louisiana Film Prize in Shreveport say this year’s entries are mostly coming from filmmakers outside the Bayou State. Executive director Gregory Kallenberg expects another big turnout for the festival weekend in October when a panel of judges and the audience decide which film will receive a $50,000 cash payout. He anticipates about 80 entries this year, on par with the first year of the contest.

Over the past few weeks, a number of small film crews have taken to the streets of Shreveport. They’ve been shooting all around northwest Louisiana, like in a vacant former restaurant in the Highland neighborhood. They’re making short films – that must be shot locally – to enter into this year’s Louisiana Film Prize contest.

As film production work pours into Louisiana, a nonprofit media arts group is helping locals access jobs and cultivating a more robust local film community. 


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