film industry

Music Inside Out

From the earliest days of motion pictures, music has played a crucial role in setting the mood for movies. Just take a look at the clip (above) of the final moments of Charlie Chaplin’s 1936 film “Modern Times.”

It’s hard to imagine that scene without the song “Smile.”

Louisiana Research Collection

A century before New Orleans was dubbed “Hollywood South,” the Crescent City was poised to become a major center for silent film studios. Producer Eve Abrams spoke with Tulane professor of communications Vicki Mayer about her Summer 2015 article for Louisiana Cultural Vistas Magazine, “Film Follies,” and about how the movie industry, culture, and the political economy intersect in Louisiana.

The state House spent most of the day Thursday debating a long list of tax increases and reductions to tax breaks. Lawmakers are trying to figure out how to get or keep more money in the treasury to help out higher education and healthcare in next year’s budget. But that’s got higher ed and healthcare pitted against industry.

Sherri McConnell is a consultant now and ran the tax incentives program for the entertainment industry for years within the Louisiana Economic Development department, so she’s been watching some pieces of this puzzle very closely.


Tuesday’s House Ways and Means hearing on bills to cap the film tax credit program brought out some of the big names in Louisiana movie-making, like Lampton Enochs of the Oscar-winning Moonbot Studios, and former Dukes of Hazzard star, John Schneider.

“I have not won an Academy Award, but I’ve seen several films that have,” Schneider said, eliciting laughter from committee members and the packed audience in attendance.

But charmed as lawmakers were by the big names, it was Louisiana residents working in the movie industry who made the biggest impression. Dozens spoke against Alexandria Rep. Lance Harris’s bill that would scale the credits down to zero over the next five years.

Industrial Development Board for the city of New Orleans has approved tax breaks worth at least $3.1 million for a proposed $63.5 million movie studio complex.

If completed, the Deep South Studios complex would be one of the biggest investments in the local film industry to date.

Louisiana Woos Movie Industry With Tax Credits

Dec 1, 2014

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Louisiana is known as the pelican state, but it's now trying out a new nickname, Hollywood South. Thanks to some very generous tax credits more movies are filmed in Louisiana than any other state, California included. From New Orleans, Kate Richardson of member station WWNO has the story.

The FBI is widening its investigation into possible fraud in the state’s film tax-credit program.

The New Orleans Advocate reports producer George Kostuch is suspected of bilking the state over inflated production costs.

Two filmmakers pleaded guilty last year to federal wire fraud charges, and are now cooperating with federal investigators.

The FBI wrote in a search warrant application that the scheme was carried out on the motion pictures Xtinction: Predator X, Sports Trivia Clash and Mysterious Island.

Kate Richardson / WWNO

The entertainment industry is synonymous with Hollywood. But in recent years lots of film and TV production has migrated to what’s now become commonly known as “Hollywood South.” Louisiana and Georgia form the core of this new industry hub because both states offer tax incentives to film and TV productions. 

The ape army descends upon the ravaged remains of San Francisco. Their leader addresses the surviving humans:

“APES DO NOT! WANT! WAR!” 

Hollywood Trucks

Hollywood South is expanding in a new direction. A new eco-friendly trailer just unveiled in New Orleans is available for A-listers and others involved in the film industry.

queenkv / Flickr

Legislation legalizing the sale of alcohol at more movie theaters won final passage Friday in the Louisiana legislature, the Times-Picayune reports.

Senate Bill 654 narrowly passed the House. It would allow movie theaters to obtain liquor licenses as long as the alcohol sales are separate from other concessions being sold.

It now heads to Governor Jindal for a signature to become law.

Five Louisiana movie theaters received their liquor permits prior to 1994, and already sell alcohol.

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