John Richie

The debate over gun safety is often presented as a black and white issue, with people either strongly for or against strict gun laws. But local filmmaker John Richie found that wasn’t the case.

Three New Things At The New Orleans Film Festival

Oct 14, 2015

When the New Orleans Film Festival was founded in 1989, it gave new filmmakers a place to screen their movies. 26 years later they’re still committed to that goal, but the festival has taken on new ambitions too. This year submissions are up nearly 60 percent and there's a chance a filmmaker could make their way to Hollywood’s famous red carpet.

Filmmaker Aviva Kempner, known for her documentaries on untold stores of Jews who made a difference in the lives of others, is back with a new film documenting the life of philanthropist Julius Rosenwald. An unsung hero, Rosenwald made a difference in the lives of African Americans by building schools in the segregated South.

An eccentric, outspoken New York fencing coach who married a Shreveporter and built a fencer’s mecca in Shreveport is the subject of a 65-minute documentary that premieres Friday at Robinson Film Center in Shreveport.

Filmmakers Michele and Jay Carter were skeptical when they learned about the Fairfield Avenue School of Fencing.

Lieutenant Governor Jay Dardenne says a movie is in the works about the Battle of New Orleans.

Atchity Brothers Entertainment will produce the feature film, "Andrew Jackson — Battle of New Orleans."  It’s based on military historian Ron Drez's latest book, "The War of 1812: Conflict And Deception."

The Advocate reports the project is endorsed by the Battle of New Orleans Bicentennial Commission.


Tête-à-Tête is a new series that uncovers extended versions of interviews conducted by WWNO journalists. Broadcasting means time limits, and often conversations that range from thirty to forty minutes in length get thirty to forty seconds on air. Tête-à-Tête brings these deeper discussions to light.

Margaret Brown directed and  co-produced "The Great Invisible" — a new documentary about the 2010 BP Oil Spill that won the Grand Jury Prize at the 2014 South by Southwest film festival. 


"The Great Invisible" is a new documentary about the 2010 BP Oil Spill opening on December 12 at the Prytania Theater. Margaret Brown, the movie's director, grew up on the Alabama coast and saw the impact the spill had on her family and neighbors.

But, as Brown continued to pay attention, she realized this was not just a story about the victims, and that the oil executives were not the only enemies.

We speak with Alexander Glustrom and Ben Johnson, filmmakers behind the new documentary "Big Charity," an exploration of the massive Charity Hospital complex on Tulane Avenue that was shuttered after Hurricane Katrina.

Kate Richardson / WWNO

Since 2002 Louisiana has provided incentives for the film and TV industry. Under the program, the state reimburses 30 percent of production expenses in the form of tax credits.

The city of New Orleans and surrounding parishes run workforce training sessions called Production Assistant Bootcamps. These help ensure that locals get jobs in the entertainment industry. This year's bootcamp took place at the Ashé Cultural Arts Center. 

The Art & Craft Of Marrying Film And Music

From the earliest days of motion pictures, music has played a crucial role in setting the mood for movies. Just take a look at the clip (above) of the final moments of Charlie Chaplin’s 1936 film “Modern Times.”

It’s hard to imagine that scene without the song “Smile.”