Livingston Parish officials claim lies, bungling and withholding of information are grounds for reversal of the Federal Emergency Management Agency's decision to deny $46 million in waterway cleanup costs Livingston incurred after Hurricane Gustav.

FEMA investigators used incorrect geographic coordinates and couldn't find streams where work was done after the 2008 hurricane, but still ruled the streams posed no flooding danger to inhabited property, according to a 76-page appeal supplement filed by the parish.

A veteran FEMA employee has been named the agency's regional administrator for Louisiana and four other states.

Tony Robinson already was serving as FEMA's Region 6 acting administrator before the agency announced his appointment Thursday.

Robinson has worked for FEMA since 1987. FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate said Robinson has provided "leadership and oversight" during more than 50 federally-declared disasters.

Region 6 also covers Arkansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.

New Orleans officials have broken ground for a new $3.6 million fire station designed to serve an area not protected by levees.

The city says the new Alba Road Fire Station in the Venetian Isles area will replace a smaller facility that was 30 years old when it flooded during Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

The station is being built with aid from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Construction began with Wednesday's groundbreaking ceremony and is to be completed this fall.

Repairs are underway to strengthen Leonard J. Chabert Medical Center against future hurricanes.

The work, which includes replacement of hospital freight elevators, windows and exterior walls, will be paid for with Federal Emergency Management Agency grant money and state infrastructure dollars.

Hospital officials tell The Courier the projects will not result in parking or patient service disruptions.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has awarded East Baton Rouge Parish a $1.5 million grant to help city-parish government with costs associated with Hurricane Isaac.

The Advocate reports the grant, part of FEMA's Public Assistance program, will help reimburse the city-parish for equipment and supplies used during the response to Isaac and the recovery effort.

The grant covers the federal share — 75 percent — of the parish's eligible costs and the state or parish will pay the remaining 25 percent.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency is sending $7.4 million to Louisiana in Hurricane Isaac recovery funds to help impacted families with additional household and education needs and more.

The FEMA dollars are going to the Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services for a Disaster Case Management Program to aid Isaac victims.

Sen. Mary Landrieu announced the new grant Tuesday and said that she had pressed for such family assistance with FEMA administrator Craig Fugate.

Following Superstorm Sandy, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has received good grades from politicians and even some survivors of the storm. In part, that's due to lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina seven years ago.

For Staten Island resident Deb Smith, whose house was flooded by the storm surge from Sandy, FEMA has been a savior.

A federal judge in New Orleans has signed off on a $37.5 million settlement involving companies that provided trailers to thousands left homeless from Gulf Coast hurricanes seven years ago. Some residents claim the trailers contained chemicals that made them sick.

Nearly 26,000 people have received individual assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency after Hurricane Isaac, aid totaling $88 million.

FEMA spokesman Ray Perez provided the latest figures Monday.

The tallies are likely to rise, as the federal agency continues to review applications for assistance from the storm, which made landfall Aug. 28 and caused significant flooding in southeast Louisiana.

More than 187,000 people have registered for FEMA help.

New Orleans will receive $27.3 million in grants from the federal government to help cover some of the city's costs related to Hurricane Isaac.

The grants from the Federal Emergency Management Agency were announced Wednesday in a joint news release by Sen. Mary Landrieu, Rep. Cedric Richmond and Mayor Mitch Landrieu. Some of the money will reimburse the city for labor and equipment for a variety of emergency protective measures including police patrols and operation of major drainage systems and pumps.