Features

World War II Museum
6:00 pm
Sun January 13, 2013

World War II Exhibit Asks Visitors, 'What Would You Do?'

The museum's U.S. Freedom Pavilion, seen here as a digital model, opened to the public on Friday.
Courtesy The National WWII Museum

For many, the stakes and the scale of World War II are hard to fathom. It was a war fought around the world, against powerful, determined regimes in Europe and the Pacific; some 65 million people died. And as the number of people who have actual memories of the war dwindle — as of next year, there will be fewer than 1 million living veterans — the mission of the National World War II Museum in New Orleans becomes all the more urgent.

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The Two-Way
12:08 am
Sun January 13, 2013

Journalist Eugene Patterson, Civil Rights Advocate, Dies

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 6:39 am

Pulitzer Prize-winning editor and columnist Eugene Patterson died Saturday of complications from prostate cancer, a family spokeswoman tells The Associated Press. He was 89.

Patterson, editor of The Atlanta-Journal Constitution from 1960 to 1968, "helped fellow Southern whites understand the civil rights movement, eloquently reminding the silent majority of its complicity in racist violence," the AP reports.

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The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Sat January 12, 2013

Aaron Swartz, Reddit Cofounder And Online Activist, Dead At 26

Aaron Swartz co-authored RSS and founded the company that later became the social media website Reddit.
Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 7:54 am

He was 14 when he co-authored RSS and later helped found the company that would become the social media website Reddit. Internet activist Aaron Swartz was found dead in his Brooklyn apartment, authorities said Saturday. He was 26.

Update at 7:42 p.m.: Swartz To Be Remembered For 'Technological Virtuosity':

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Remembrances
4:07 pm
Sat January 12, 2013

Remembering PFLAG Founder And Mother

Jeanne Manford, gay rights advocate and PFLAG founder.
PFLAG National

Originally published on Sat January 12, 2013 9:32 pm

President Obama spoke about Jeanne Manford in a speech he gave at the annual Human Rights Campaign National Dinner in 2009. Her son, Morty, was an important figure in New York City's gay community during the turbulent 1970s.

"Soon after the protests at Stonewall 40 years ago, the phone rang in the home of a soft-spoken elementary school teacher named Jeanne Manford," he said. A police officer told her Morty had been arrested.

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Features
4:41 pm
Thu January 10, 2013

Growing Home Helps New Orleans Invest Millions to Landscape Vacant Land

Linda and Chester Blunt built several raised vegetable beds on their new lot.
Abigail Feldman

You see it in your neighborhood or on your way to work: an abandoned house or empty lot — a small piece of New Orleans which once belonged to someone, but now, is sagging or overgrown or both.

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Remembrances
1:06 pm
Wed January 9, 2013

How Nixon Re-Shaped The Presidency

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 1:55 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee.

But it is a special day. On this day, 100 years ago, Richard Milhous Nixon was born in Yorba Linda, California. He later became a U.S. representative, a senator, a vice president, and finally, 37th president of the United States. From civil rights to Watergate, Nixon's term shaped perceptions of the modern office of the presidency and creating quite a few memorable soundbites in the process.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED AUDIO)

PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON: Sock it to me

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Remembrances
3:46 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Remembering Virtuoso Sports Writer Richard Ben Cramer

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 5:26 am

Author Richard Ben Cramer was an award-winning writer who explored politics and sports. Herculean reporting, compelling writing and bursts of insight born of that research and wordsmanship were the hallmarks of Cramer. He died Monday at the age of 62.

Remembrances
3:51 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

'What It Takes' Author Remembered As An Engrossing Figure

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 5:37 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

If anyone knew what it took to cover a presidential campaign, it was Richard Ben Cramer. His book about the 1988 election, titled "What It Takes," was the defining campaign treatment of the last half century. Prior to that, Cramer was a Pulitzer-winning foreign correspondent for the Philadelphia Inquirer.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Cramer died Monday of complications from lung cancer. He was 62. NPR's David Folkenflik has this remembrance.

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NPR Story
3:32 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

Architecture Critic Huxtable Remembered For Clever, Biting Commentary

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 5:37 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable had a pillow stitched with the words: Ada Louise Huxtable already doesn't like it. That was the zingy caption of a New Yorker cartoon from 1968. The cartoon showed a rough construction site with only a single column erected. A construction worker in a hardhat is holding a newspaper reading Huxtable's scathing critique to the architect. Ada Louise Huxtable, who pioneered architecture criticism, died yesterday in Manhattan. She was 91.

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Remembrances
5:06 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Author Richard Ben Cramer Dies at 62

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 6:05 am

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Ben Cramer died Monday at the age of 62. His book What it Takes became a classic tome about presidential campaigns.

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