features

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Every week in Old Mandeville, the gray stucco train depot comes alive for the Mandeville Trailhead Community Market. Sponsored by the city, it saw about 24,000 visitors last year and hosts about 60 vendors every Saturday.

The market is a place to buy local crafts, soap, honey, baked goods and plants. Plus, it provides many with companionship and community.

Chris Kehoe

The recently renovated St. Roch Market was vandalized Thursday evening, with the front and side walls covered in paint and several windows broken, according to WDSU.com.

St. Roch Market is one of the last of the original city markets that formerly dotted New Orleans' cityscape. Built in 1875, the landmark has just recently been reopened to the public.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

16 years ago New Orleans resident Hunter Higgins created a triathlon with some friends that revolved around Jazz Fest. This "unsanctioned" event has a small footprint — think blocks of strenuous exercise, not miles. But it's been a way for a growing local group of participants to show their New Orleans pride.

Zack Smith / Music Inside Out

Onstage, they don’t look like a traditional rock ‘n roll band. Sure, the seven members of Sweet Crude are kinda young and kinda scrawny and their clothes suggest a GAP-meets-Garanimals flare.

But they carry no guitars. Five of them play percussion. And yes, there’s a glockenspiel in the mix.

Sweet Crude sounds different too. They produce a sophisticated mixture of rhythm, classical strings, and musical theater that’s highly danceable and even educational. That’s because the band sings in English and Louisiana French – a language they’re learning on the job.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

On Saturday, May 2 Orleans Parish residents will vote on whether to fund local public libraries through a property tax hike. It would raise around $8 million a year for the library system, for the next 25 years.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Who's still thinking about Christmas in spring? The New Orleans Department of Sanitation, the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Guard. This generation-long partnership comes together for the annual Christmas tree drop. Christmas trees are picked up curbside after the new year, packaged into bundles, and dropped via helicopter into a local wetlands area to build back land mass. The National Guard uses it as a training exercise, and the nearby wildlife refuge Bayou Sauvage gets a coastal restoration project.

Eve Abrams

The YMCA of Greater New Orleans is taking steps to reduce the burden of diabetes by offering a Diabetes Prevention Program, so that people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes don’t.

When you think YMCA, what comes to mind?

Volleyball, helping kids, swimming, gymnastics, the gym, the song.

One of Lafayette’s rising stars, blues rocker Lane Mack, released his self-titled debut earlier this month, and it hit No. 2 on the iTunes blues charts.

After his son was born, Mack says he wanted to record a collection of his own songs rooted in the blues and Cajun music he was raised on.


Eve Troeh / WWNO

Crowds filled the Fairgrounds as the 46th annual New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival started its annual seven days of festing.

From a homegrown showcase for local talent, Jazz Fest has grown to include top national pop stars (which the festival officially calls “guest artists") alongside New Orleans' favorite jazz, blues, rock, gospel, hip hop, brass band and other talent. The nonprofit Jazz and Heritage Foundation has produced the festival in partnership with international production company AEG since 2004.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

It's been five years since the 2010 BP oil spill. On the day of the actual anniversary, a march and rally took place in the Central Business District to commemorate the people and places impacted by the spill. Marchers went from Lafayette Square to Jackson Square, dressed in all black to represent the 210 million gallons of oil that spilled into the Gulf of Mexico.

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