features

The Record
10:17 am
Wed June 13, 2012

A Night Out In New Orleans' New Bohemia

Quintron (at left, in suit and shorts) conducts while Lady Tambourine plays at The Music Box on Saturday night.
Zack Smith

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:40 pm

I'm spending June in New Orleans, digging into the soft wet earth of American music. A week in, I feel like I've barely begun to explore. The minute I try to say what draws me to New Orleans music, I realize that the core of it is always changing. It's not just the variety, though I love that in the first few days here, I caught classic blues on Frenchmen Street, a wild bounce night downtown, my longtime favorite Susan Cowsill singing Dusty Springfield covers in the Garden District, and a brass band on the corner in the French Quarter.

Read more
The Times-Picayune
12:44 am
Wed June 13, 2012

City news organizations respond to Times-Picayune layoffs

News of the widespread layoffs at The Times-Picayune, the city’s only daily newspaper and a mainstay of morning routine for generations of New Orleanians, continued to reverberate throughout the city’s media establishment late Tuesday.

Read more
Summer Science
4:08 am
Tue June 12, 2012

Summer Science: The Perfectly Toasted Marshmallow

Joe Palca's perfectly toasted marshmallow.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 7:18 am

It's the epic quest of campers everywhere: How do you get the perfectly toasted marshmallow? In our inaugural installment of NPR's Summer Science series, we gave some guidance on the first key ingredient: how to build the campfire. (Later this summer, we'll attempt to answer the vexing question of how to stave off brain freeze.)

Read more
U.S.
4:27 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Program Teaches Vets How To Survive The Classroom

Jay Blake (left), who served in the Marines, rides the elevator with his fellow students at Sierra Community College in Rocklin, Calif.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon June 11, 2012 9:55 pm

Most American troops have left Iraq, and many have left Afghanistan. Now more than half a million of them have left the service — and they're going to college. Some vets say the transition is like landing on another planet, but they aren't the only ones struggling: The college staffs are, too.

Read more
Louisiana Prison Policy
2:07 pm
Mon June 11, 2012

Loyola panel to examine Louisiana's exploding prison population

Loyola University's Institute for Quality and Equity in Education, in conjunction with the Foundation for Louisiana, will host “Louisiana Incarcerated: An Evening with Cindy Chang,” a panel discussion convened to examine the multifaceted issue of the business of incarceration in Louisiana.

Read more
The Diamond Jubilee
8:24 pm
Sat June 9, 2012

Tabasco gift spices up queen's jubilee

NEW IBERIA — The McIlhenny Co. got in on the pomp and circumstance of Queen Elizabeth II's diamond jubilee by sending the monarch a sterling silver Tabasco sauce holder.

The Daily Iberian reports company chairman and CEO Paul McIlhenny said it's rare the company sends such gifts to royalty, but he thought the Queen's 60 years on the British throne deserved a present.

Elizabeth came to the throne on Feb. 6, 1952 on the death of her father King George VI. Her coronation took place in June 1953.

Fresh Air
11:37 am
Tue June 5, 2012

How Louisiana Became The World's 'Prison Capital'

In the past two decades, Louisiana's prison population has doubled.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 1:07 pm

A new expose by The Times-Picayune of New Orleans calls Louisiana the "world's prison capital."

The state imprisons more people per capita than any other state or country in the world, with one out of every 86 adults behind bars. Its rate of incarceration is three times higher than Iran's and 10 times higher than Germany's.

How did Louisiana double its prison population in the past 20 years? And what differentiates it from other states?

Read more
Summer Science
1:42 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Summer Science: How To Build A Campfire

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 10:10 am

Summer living is supposed to be easy — school is out, the days are long, the traffic eases. But it's not all inner tubes and lemonade: Summer can throw us some curveballs, too. How can I avoid sunburn? What can I do to stave off that brain freeze? Why do my s'mores always burn?

Fear not; NPR is here to help. As part of our new Summer Science series, we'll turn to science to tackle these vexing questions, starting with how to build the perfect campfire.

Read more
Notes from New Orleans
5:00 am
Fri June 1, 2012

The Many Hats of Chef Johnny Blancher

The desire to source food locally has caused many restaurants to reevaluate how they do business. That's just one of the reasons why a local chef has transformed a patch of land across from his establishment into an urban farmstead. On this week's Notes from New Orleans we'll hear how farming is just one of the many responsibilities juggled by Johnny Blancher.

To read a related article written by Sharon Litwin, visit Nolavie.com.

The Listening Room
4:38 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

Intelligence Squared Debate Series: College Football

Corruption and a growing concern for head injury have put college football in the spotlight. Are football program's millions in profits exploitation? Or are they still a celebration of amateur sport?

Read more

Pages