features

Music Inside Out
6:04 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Tickling the Ivories with Deacon John Moore

Deacon John at the House of Blues.
Jason Saul American Routes
  • Deacon John, on Music Inside Out.

Deacon John's mother wanted him to be a singer, but she hated rock 'n roll.

Oh well.

Mrs. Moore's little boy picked up a guitar, and it wasn't long before rock 'n roll came tumbling out. His bandmates named him Deacon John. But he also recorded at least one song under the name Johnny Moore. Deacon John's early recordings were high energy and danceable, just like his stage show. But "You Don't Know How (To Turn Me On)" and "Haven't I Been Good To You," signaled only a fragment of what the Deacon could do.

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JazzSet
12:56 pm
Thu July 12, 2012

Rez Abbasi Acoustic Quartet, Trio Da Paz On JazzSet

Rez Abbasi performs at the Newport Jazz Festival.
Erik Jacobs for NPR

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:39 am

We're in a guitar world, from Pakistan to Brazil and from steel strings to nylon, as the Rez Abbasi Acoustic Quartet and Trio da Paz play in turn at the Newport Jazz Festival.

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Music Interviews
11:03 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Fresh Air Celebrates Woody Guthrie At 100

Woody Guthrie
Smithsonian Folkways

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 11:52 am

Lots of people know Woody Guthrie's classic 1940 ballad "This Land Is Your Land," but the story behind the tune may not be as familiar.

Guthrie, who would have turned 100 this week, wrote "This Land" as a response to Irving Berlin's "God Bless America," a song he felt was overly patriotic and not directed at ordinary Americans like himself.

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:58 am
Thu July 12, 2012

Thinking Too Much About Chalk

Ayodha Ouditt NPR

Originally published on Wed August 1, 2012 11:31 am

One day, the great novelist and essayist G. K. Chesterton decided to go sketching. He brought his colored chalks, his reds, blues, yellows and greens to a hill in South England, but he forgot to bring white. Damn, he thought, what an idiot, to leave out the crucial one. "Without white," he wrote, "my absurd little pictures would be...pointless." What to do? "I sat on the hill in a sort of despair."

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Notes from New Orleans
5:00 am
Thu July 12, 2012

New Orleans Celebrates Its French Heritage

Fireworks in Paris to celebrate Bastille Day. There will be a fireworks display on the Mississippi River on July 13th at 9pm.

The French community in New Orleans has worked with several Francophile and francophone organizations to prepare the city's first-ever "Bastille Day Fete." On this week's Notes from New Orleans, Sharon Litwin speaks with a member of the local French Consulate to hear how the weekend long celebration will spread joie de vivre.

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Music Interviews
3:42 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

At 100, Woody Guthrie Still Resonates

July 14, 2012, is the 100th anniversary of Woody Guthrie's birth.
Al Aumuller Courtesy of the Woody Guthrie Archives

Originally published on Fri July 13, 2012 10:16 am

Woody Guthrie would have been 100 years old on Saturday. The singer and songwriter wrote "This Land Is Your Land," among thousands of other songs.

Even though Guthrie died almost 45 years ago, his lyrics and message continue to appeal to new generations of Americans.

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Book Reviews
11:23 am
Wed July 11, 2012

'A Door In The Ocean' Leads To Dark Depths

Originally published on Mon July 16, 2012 1:23 pm

Many of the key scenes in David McGlynn's striking new memoir, A Door in the Ocean, take place at the beach or in swimming pools. McGlynn was a surfer and competitive swimmer in his school days and still squeezes into his Speedos for races like the annual 5K "Gatorman" off the coast of La Jolla, Calif. Ocean swimming, in particular, transports McGlynn to another realm, and he does a terrific job of dramatizing the allure of solitary swims in open water. Midway through his book, he writes:

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Movie Interviews
11:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

'Margaret:' Inside The 'Fall' Of A Teenager

In Margaret, Lisa (Anna Paquin) distracts a bus driver, which leads to an accident in which a pedestrian is run over and dies.
Fox Searchlight Pictures

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 12:32 pm

Kenneth Lonergan's critically acclaimed film Margaret was completed in 2006, but because of several lawsuits, it wasn't released until last year.

Called "nothing short of a masterwork" by The New Yorker, the film stars Anna Paquin as Lisa, a Manhattan teenager who tries to make sense of a bus accident she may have caused — one that resulted in a woman's death. Lonergan tells Terry Gross that he wrote the film because he was interested in how teenagers transition into an adult world.

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6:16 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Diane Mack — Top Female Achiever

Lead in text: 
This month, New Orleans Magazine recognizes WWNO's Diane Mack as its Top Female Achiever. "Over the years [Diane] has been the local host of NPR's flagship news programs, hosted a classical music shift and written and produced interviews for coverage of Tulane University's Friends of Music concert series. She is also the award-winning producer of "Inside the Arts," the station's series on the cultural arts." At WWNO we all know and admire Diane for her hard work, dedication, and creativity, and we are delighted that New Orleans Magazine has likewise recognized her talents.
  • Source: Myneworleans
  • | Via: New Orleans Magazine | Photo by Marylou Uttermohlen
Announcer and Producer, WWNO-FM Monday through Friday, beginning at 5 a.m., the smooth voice of WWNO-FM's Diane Mack begins to gently ease thousands of sleepy New Orleans area listeners into their daily routines. Mack's distinctive delivery style made its on-air debut here in 1982 when she joined WDSU-TV as a newscaster.
Around the Nation
4:25 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Homeless Rural Vets Find A Place To Call Home

American Legion Post Cmdr. Mark Czmyr and his father, Navy veteran William Czmyr, originated the idea to create permanent apartments for homeless vets in Jewett City, Conn.
Lucy Nalpathanchil for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:34 pm

This month, more than a dozen homeless veterans will finally have a place to call their own, thanks to the American Legion.

The organization's post in a small Connecticut town has been working for a decade on a unique project to create not transitional but permanent supportive housing in their rural community.

For 55-year-old Army veteran Jeff MacDonald, the new facility in Jewett City, Conn., was like "winning the lottery."

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