features

Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
3:53 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

Sonny Landreth's Extraordinary Sound

Sonny Landreth
Brian C. Miller Richard

If you've never seen Sonny Landreth's hands glide over the fret of his slide guitar, you should. It's like watching someone touch the finest of silk.

If you've never heard Sonny Landreth play the blues, or classical music or flat out rock 'n roll, you should. His sound is extraordinary.

Landreth's fans include John Hiatt, Eric Clapton, Bonnie Raitt and Johnny Winter — with whom he toured earlier this year.

Not bad for a self-described "stepson" of Louisiana, born in Mississippi and raised on big helpings of Cajun and Zydeco music.

Read more
Books
5:37 am
Sat September 15, 2012

'The Black Count,' A Hero On The Field, And The Page

General Thomas-Alexandre Dumas.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 10:35 am

Gen. Thomas-Alexandre Dumas was one of the heroes of the French Revolution — but you won't find a statue of him in Paris today.

He led armies of thousands in triumph through treacherous territory, from the snows of the Alps to the sands of Egypt, and his true life stories inspired his son, Alexandre Dumas, to write The Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
1:03 am
Sat September 15, 2012

Trouble In The Twin Cities: Two Orchestras In Labor Disputes

The Minnesota Orchestra may go on strike after management proposed to cut musicians' salaries by 28 percent.
Courtesy of the Minnesota Orchestra

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:47 pm

For a metro area of only about 3.5 million people, the Twin Cities region is unusual in the way it supports not one, but two world-class orchestras. Now, with looming deficits on the horizon and musicians' contracts at both the Minnesota Orchestra and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra expiring Sept. 30, the Twin Cities may have two orchestras on strike.

Read more
Music Interviews
1:03 am
Sat September 15, 2012

Calexico: Road Songs For Wandering Souls

John Convertino and Joey Burns have been performing as Calexico since 1996. Their latest album is called Algiers.
Jairo Zavala Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 9:55 am

At 11 a.m. on a weekday, Calexico rehearses for its upcoming tour in a cramped studio on the south side of Tucson, Ariz. The stereotypical musician would just be getting up, but lead singer and songwriter Joey Burns has been up since dawn with his twin baby girls.

Trumpet player Jacob Valenzuela arrives late to the rehearsal — and that's because his washing machine broke and he had to deal with a small flood. Valenzuela grabs his trumpet as the band launches into "Splitter," the first single from Calexico's new album.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:50 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Revisiting Life Magazine's 'Take-Over Generation'

Sept. 14, 1962, issue profiling promising young Americans of the time." href="/post/revisiting-life-magazines-take-over-generation" class="noexit lightbox">
Life magazine cover from the Sept. 14, 1962, issue profiling promising young Americans of the time.
LIFE©1962 Time Inc

Originally published on Sat September 15, 2012 5:19 pm

Note: A shorter version of this story aired on your local member station.

Fifty years ago this month, Life magazine published its take on the 100 most promising young professionals of the midcentury. The special issue, titled "The Take-Over Generation," highlighted some of the "young movers and shakers of the country," Roy Rowan, the magazine's assistant managing editor at the time, tells reporter Richard L. Harris.

Read more
Movie Interviews
3:42 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Richard Gere On Playing A Jerk You Want To Root For

Originally published on Fri September 14, 2012 4:50 pm

In the new movie Arbitrage, actor Richard Gere plays a Wall Street tycoon who is intent on making money, no matter the fallout. Audie Cornish talks to Gere about the film.

StoryCorps
9:03 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

From Topless Bar To Biology: A Love Story

Biologists Philip and Susan McClinton started their life together, in 1972, in a very different place.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 10:56 am

Read more
Investigations
5:44 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

When Telemarketers Pocket Money Meant For Charity

Telemarketers at work at an InfoCision call center. The for-profit company solicits millions in charitable donations each year and also provides marketing services to for-profit clients.
Courtesy of InfoCision

Originally published on Thu September 13, 2012 1:55 pm

Americans donate billions of dollars to charity each year, and a portion of that money is raised by telemarketing solicitations.

Some of those charitable contributions are solicited by InfoCision Management Corp., an Ohio-based telemarketing company that, on its website, claims to raise more money for nonprofit organizations over the phone than any other company n the world.

Read more
NolaVie
12:55 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Urban Icons: Metairie's Muffler Man, battered and bruised by Isaac, down but not out

The Metairie Big Man after the storm.
Glen Abbott

He survived Hurricane Katrina and numerous tropical torments large and small.

But Isaac proved too much for Metairie’s Big Man statue, knocking him from the perch he’s occupied for more than 35 years near the corner of Clearview Parkway and West Napoleon Avenue, breaking off his head and one arm.

The two-story fiberglass “muffler man” has served as a landmark and company mascot for Clearview Auto Title & Notary since 1975, when business owner Sal Mortillaro purchased him for $400 from a New Orleans Midas Muffler shop.

Read more
Inside the Arts
12:53 pm
Tue September 11, 2012

Healing Art, A Case for Solomon and Truth Universal on Rap

Today you'll hear from renowned artist Richard Thomas, who takes us on a post Katrina healing journey... and we'll delve into a Louisiana kidnapping mystery, plus gain a little wisdom from the art of rap.

Pages