features

Out To Lunch
1:00 pm
Mon October 8, 2012

Inspiration on Out to Lunch

Arman Sadeghpour, Peter Ricchiuti and Sean Simone.
Grant Morris It's New Orleans

Inspiration is putting two things together that haven’t been put together before. For example, making toothpaste out of chocolate. Or turning your cell phone into a 650,000-volt stun gun.

Arman Sadeghpour is co-founder and CEO of Theodent, the revolutionary toothpaste that turns chocolate into the dentist’s friend, and Sean Simone is the co-founder of Yellow Jacket Case, the cell phone case that’s a stun gun.

Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:00 pm
Thu October 4, 2012

Givonna Joseph and OperaCréole

OperaCréole: Wilfred Delphin, pianist; Valerie Jones Francis, soprano; Tyrone Chambers, tenor; Crystal Morris, soprano; Givonna Joseph, mezzo soprano; Brandon Richardson, baritone; Aria Mason, mezzo soprano. Not pictured: Ivan Griffin, bass.
Illinois State University

This month, OperaCréole will hold a concert in honor of Scott Joplin and Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, two composers of African descent, whose operatic works were never fully realized. The group will perform selections from Joplin's much-debated "Treemonisha" (Is it, or is it not grand opera?) and Coleridge -Taylor's "Thelma," which was lost for nearly 100 years before a graduate student discovered it reportedly in the archives of the British Library.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:00 pm
Thu September 27, 2012

Reggie Scanlan — Bass Lion

Reggie Scanlan
Fantail Media Flickr

There's a reason why lions prefer the company of other lions. Just ask Reggie Scanlan. As a bass player, Scanlan worked with James Booker and Professor Longhair before starting a 33-year run with the Radiators. He's now in a band of all-stars called the New Orleans Suspects.

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A Blog Supreme
4:39 pm
Tue September 25, 2012

Review: 'Treme,' Ep. 22: 'Dem Songs Is Gonna Stand, Son'

Antoine Batiste (Wendell Pierce) plays in a tribute to tuba player Kerwin James.
Paul Schiraldi HBO

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 5:42 pm

If you've been watching the HBO series Treme with us, welcome back.

If you're new here, welcome in the first place. WBGO's Josh Jackson, a New Orleans native, and I have been watching the music-saturated program set in post-Katrina New Orleans for two years now. After every episode, we try to establish some context for the many musical references and live performances the show features.

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Latin America
3:23 pm
Tue September 25, 2012

Bolivia's Cerro Rico: The Mountain That Eats Men

Cerro Rico, or Rich Mountain, rises like a monument in Potosi, Bolivia. It has produced silver, and hardship, for centuries. Now it may be in danger of collapse.
Carlos Villalon for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 6:39 pm

Near the mountain city of Potosi in the southern highlands of Bolivia, the cone-shaped peak of Cerro Rico stands as a 15,800-foot monument to the tragedies of Spanish conquest. For centuries, Indian slaves mined the mountain's silver in brutal conditions to bankroll the Spanish empire.

Today, the descendants of those slaves run the mines. But hundreds of years of mining have left the mountain porous and unstable, and experts say it is in danger of collapsing.

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Around the Nation
5:01 pm
Sun September 23, 2012

Rising Income Gap Shapes Residential Segregation

Mechelle Baylor's home in the Shaw area of Washington, D.C., has been in her family since 1929. She says she's seen her neighborhood change a lot as her neighbors move out and higher-income earners move in.
Amy Held NPR

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 12:20 pm

The income gap is receiving much attention lately as more Americans are isolating themselves around "people like us."

More accurately, they surround themselves with people who earn similar incomes, and it is now fueling a rise in residential segregation. One recent study suggests the income gap might be greater today than even during colonial times – even when you account for slavery.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:00 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Susan Cowsill: What Is Happy?

Susan Cowsill
Dennis Gardner

Like most girls her age, Susan Cowsill watched The Partridge Family every week on television. But unlike most girls her age, she was related to the Partridges, albeit in a Hollywood kind of way. The show was modeled after Cowsill and other members of her singing family.

In the 1960s and early '70s, The Cowsills were regulars on television, appearing with Ed Sullivan, Johnny Cash and on their own programs. They also had a string of top ten hits, including "The Rain, the Park and Other Things," and "Hair."

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:00 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

With Hats And Umbrellas, Senegalese Fill A New York City Niche

Senegalese vendor Cheikh Fall prepares his stall in front of Brooks Brothers on 51st Street, just off the Avenue of the Americas in New York City. Fall runs an association of Senegalese vendors that deals with the city over licensing and regulations.
Art Silverman NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

Careful planning can transform the shape and life of a city. But sometimes, a city's features develop spontaneously — like the immigrant enclaves that grow around certain jobs and trades in urban centers like New York.

Occupational cliches have been a fact of life in the Big Apple for generations. Historically, New Yorkers thought of Jewish tailors, Italian greengrocers or Irish policemen, says Philip Kasinitz, a sociologist with the City University of New York.

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Author Interviews
2:36 am
Tue September 18, 2012

Becoming 'Anton,' Or, How Rushdie Survived A Fatwa

Salman Rushdie's other novels include Midnight's Children, Shame and Luka and the Fire of Life." href="/post/becoming-anton-or-how-rushdie-survived-fatwa" class="noexit lightbox">
Salman Rushdie's other novels include Midnight's Children, Shame and Luka and the Fire of Life.
Syrie Moskowitz Random House

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:04 am

The recent violence sparked by the film Innocence of Muslims recalls a very different controversy from more than 20 years ago:

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Out to Lunch
1:02 pm
Mon September 17, 2012

Make It Right

Peter Couhig, President and CEO of Resource Environmental Solutions.
Grant Morris It's New Orleans

Brad Pitt’s Make It Right rebuilding effort in the 9th Ward was a beacon in the darkness after Hurricane Katrina and is still building houses today.

Taylor Royle, Communications Director of Make It Right, joins Peter on Out to Lunch, along with Peter Couhig, the President and CEO of Resource Environmental Solutions, who is working to save us from the next big hurricane.

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