features

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
1:32 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Live Chat Tuesday: Talk To Bob Marshall About Challenges Facing Coastal Louisiana

Last week, we began a series on the crisis facing the Louisiana coast, reported by The Lens’ Bob Marshall and produced by our own Fred Kasten. The stories lay out the causes of Louisiana’s coastal loss and what can be done to reverse it.

Tuesday at 1 p.m., Marshall will participate in a live chat about whether there’s hope for the coast. Is it too late to reverse the accelerating loss of land? Should we spend $50 billion in restoration projects?

Read more
The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
7:45 am
Mon May 20, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — River Diversions

The Davis Pond Freshwater Diversion Structure in 1999 and 2003. The structure part of a project that is attempting to reverse land loss and ecosystem degradation in the marshlands.
Credit NASA Earth Observatory

It’s almost impossible to find anyone in coastal Louisiana opposed to the idea of “coastal restoration.” Storms like Katrina, Gustav and Isaac have shown everyone the value of the marshes and swamps that once stood between them and the Gulf.

But when “restore” means turning things back to the way they once were, problems can arise.

The best-known example of that is the conflict over using river diversions.

Read more
The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
7:45 am
Fri May 17, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — The Master Plan

Construction of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Surge Barrier in Lake Borgne. The barrier is 1.8 miles long.
Credit Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority

If you’ve been listening and reading along this week, by now you know the consensus among coastal experts is that New Orleans and southeast Louisiana are headed for an early grave before the end of the century.

Because of river levees and damage from oil and gas canals, the wetlands that once protected this city from the Gulf have been reduced by more than half. And now what’s left of this landmass is sinking, at the same time the Gulf is rising due to global warming.

Read more
Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:00 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Sonny Landreth: Master Of The Slide Guitar

Credit Brian C. Miller Richard

Listen to Gwen & Sonny

If you've never seen Sonny Landreth's hands glide over the fret of his slide guitar, you should. It's like watching someone touch the finest of silk.

Read more
Dalai Lama
10:49 am
Thu May 16, 2013

As With Dalai Lama Today, Pope's Visit To New Orleans 25 Years Ago Came Amid Violence

The Dalai Lama.

On Friday, the Dalai Lama will be giving the first of two public talks at the New Orleans theatre in the Convention Center. For many, the Dalai Lama’s visit is reminiscent of the last major religious leader to pass through New Orleans 25 years ago.

When Pope John Paul II visited New Orleans in 1987 it was described as the Super Bowl of all Super Bowls.

25 years later, Archbishop Gregory Aymond remembers it well.

Read more
The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
7:30 am
Thu May 16, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — How We Got This Way: Rising Seas, Sinking Land

A street submerged by water in Venice, La. in 2010.
Credit Jason Saul / WWNO

The clang of tide gauges throughout parts of southeast Louisiana aren’t from a science fiction movie, though they may make residents feel like they’re caught in one.

Those sounds tell the stories of rising tides along the Gulf Coast and melting glaciers in the Arctic. And they tell how scientists believe those two events, taking place thousands of miles apart, are the reasons why the Gulf of Mexico is on pace to submerge most of southeast Louisiana by the end of the century — if nothing is done.

Read more
Latest News
7:00 am
Thu May 16, 2013

Tibetan Monks Constructing A Mandala

By the time it is finished on Friday morning, the mandala will fill up the entire table. Shortly thereafter, it will be swept away and ceremonially deposited into the Mississippi River.
Credit Thomas Walsh / WWNO

One part of the Dalai Lama’s visit to New Orleans is the creation of a sand sculpture by Tibetan monks. The meticulous process is open to public view outside Hall G at the Convention Center.

Read more
Features
10:04 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Equest Farm: Country Mouse In The City

Leslie Kramer, owner of Equest Farm, with her horse Charlie.
Credit Maureen McMurray / WWNO

In his State of the City Address last week, Mayor Mitch Landrieu praised the New Orleans Recreation Development Commission for the growth of this year’s summer youth programs, which include 33 youth camps, seven teen camps and an expanded summer jobs program. For parents and guardians seeking something a bit more rural, it’s also possible — and right within New Orleans city limits.

Located in the northernmost reaches of City Park, Equest Farm is straight out of a Laura Ingalls Wilder novel. 

Read more
The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
7:45 am
Wed May 15, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — How We Got This Way: Canal Dredging

Man-made canals in the Barataria Basin wetlands.
Dr. Terry McTigue NOAA

These days when fishing guide Ryan Lambert motors away from the boat launch in Buras, he’s fishing in the what locals call “the land of used-to-bes.”

As in, that used to be Yellow Cotton Bay, or Drake Bay, or English Bay… and dozens more. It’s all one big open body of water now because the marshes, cypress swamps and ridges that separated these water bodies for most of his life are gone.

Read more
The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
7:45 am
Tue May 14, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — How We Got This Way: The Mississippi River

A plan of the city of New Orleans and the Mississippi delta, from 1759.
Thomas Jefferys Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library

Anyone flying into New Orleans on a clear day now looks down on a panorama of delicate marsh floating like green lace on the brown waters of the Mississippi delta. Those wetlands seem endless — stretching to the horizons.

But scientists tell us we’re really looking at the skeletal remains of a vast wetland ecosystem that presented huge challenges to European explorers back in the 16th century.

Read more

Pages