features

Mallory Falk / WWNO

 

Our series "Closing Costs" follows three New Orleans schools who lost their charters.

At Lagniappe Academies, some administrators tried to hide a lack of services for students with disabilities. The state and Recovery School District chose to close the school, which is a cluster of mobile classrooms in Tremé, rather than find a new operator.

The last day starts off in the cafeteria. Students perform the school chants and cheers one last time.

Pop songs alternate with the chants. Students dance, some with carefully choreographed dance routines.

Tim McLean

What happens when you put an artist and a scientist in the same boat? The local artist residency ‘A Studio In The Woods’ aimed to find out, with their new fellowship "Flint and Steel: Cross-disciplinary Combustion". It matches artists with Tulane University faculty to explore social and environmental change through art.

Joe Shriner

Author Andrew Lawler sits down with us on this week’s Louisiana Eats! to discuss Why Did The Chicken Cross The World, which is also the title of his new book. You’ll be amazed by the many ways that simple bird has impacted humanity over the ages. Even Queen Victoria gets into the act, with her fascination for fancy hybrid chickens helping to bring about the “chicken bubble.” Would you pay thousands of dollars for a clucker? Nineteenth century Europeans did!

Ian McNulty

You can chalk up the fiery burn of some dishes at Red’s Chinese to potent chiles. And that fleeting tingle across your tongue? That’s the work of Szechuan peppercorns. But what really gets the blood pulsing at this new Bywater restaurant goes beyond individual ingredients, and gets to something on the rise for restaurants around New Orleans.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post explores how people handle childcare in New Orleans.

 

wikicommons

Since the debate over the noise ordinance came to a standstill last April, live music advocates and neighborhood groups are stuck with an unlikely piece of legislation to deal with sound in the city:  zoning.

It’s early evening on Frenchmen Street, and the doors of this bar are wide open. Tourists are drifting in and out, and the music is free. It’s also illegal.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

The school year is winding down, and for three New Orleans charters, the last day will bring dramatic changes. Two of those schools are closing for good. The third – kindergarten through 8th grade school Andrew H. Wilson Charter – is getting a new operator.

The story of Wilson's future is the first in WWNO's series Closing Costs.

Wilson's contract was up for review this year. The school had to earn a D to get renewed. It missed the grade by less than one point.

Louisiana Research Collection

A century before New Orleans was dubbed “Hollywood South,” the Crescent City was poised to become a major center for silent film studios. Producer Eve Abrams spoke with Tulane professor of communications Vicki Mayer about her Summer 2015 article for Louisiana Cultural Vistas Magazine, “Film Follies,” and about how the movie industry, culture, and the political economy intersect in Louisiana.

Eve Abrams

Wetland Resources plants hurricane resistant trees to protect Louisiana’s coastline.

Demetra Kandalepas is a senior scientist at Wetland Resources. We’re on the way to visit their bald cypress and tupelo nursery. It’s in the middle of a marsh. We drive down a muddy path next to a huge, raised pipe.

Lately, schools have been adding arts integration and experiential learning to their curriculum, but these are things that the Waldorf educational system has been doing for nearly a century. A local branch was started 15 years ago and gets more popular each year.

For NolaVie, Renée Peck brings us this report.

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