features

Food
9:58 am
Fri May 24, 2013

A Seat At The Table With The 'Queen Of Creole Cuisine'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Sarah Vaughan, Duke Ellington. That sounds like the guest list of a party you wish you'd been invited to. And in a way, you were, because all of these famous names were regular visitors to one of New Orleans' best loved restaurants.

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Community
9:25 am
Fri May 24, 2013

New News Habits In New Orleans

A year later, these friends are still gathering to talk over the paper, but it's not The Times-Picayune. From left: Sue Paraski, Sharon Morrow, Eric Hartman, Joe Mole.
Credit Bevil Knapp

A year ago today, news leaked that The Times-Picayune would cease daily publication, cut staff and focus on its website, NOLA.com. The paper and ink edition now hits doorsteps and newsstands just three days a week: Wednesday, Friday and Sunday.

History and tradition play an outsized role in New Orleans. So perhaps it is no surprise that The Times-Picayune’s move has led to a modern-day version of a relic of media history: the newspaper war.

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Features
3:44 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

In La., Families Still Searching For Storm-Scattered Remains

Lionel Alverez stands at a family tomb in Plaquemines Parish, La. Hurricane Isaac's storm surge split the double-decker tomb in half, leaving his aunt's and sister's caskets on the bottom but washing away his mother's, which was on top.
Keith O'Brien for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 7:23 pm

Lionel Alverez is in the Promised Land Cemetery again, taking inventory. He has been coming to this cemetery in Plaquemines Parish, La., all his life. The graveyard is hemmed in between the Mississippi River and the marsh on a lonely stretch of highway.

Promised Land has been the final resting place for the Alverezes for generations. Alverez, 61, points out several graves, one by one. "Albert Alverez. Huey Alverez and Harold Alverez. My brother Allen is near the rear, back there."

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
1:00 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Susan Cowsill: The Sound Of Happy

Credit Dennis Gardner

Like most girls her age, Susan Cowsill watched The Partridge Family every week on television. But unlike most girls her age, she was related to the Partridges, albeit in a Hollywood kind of way.

The show was modeled after Cowsill and other members of her singing family.

In the 1960s and early '70s, The Cowsills were regulars on television, appearing with Ed Sullivan, Johnny Cash and on their own programs. They also had a string of top ten hits, including "The Rain, the Park and Other Things," and "Hair."

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Summer Camp
8:30 am
Thu May 23, 2013

'Camp Upward' Provides Northshore Families Affordable Summer Camp Options

For many kids in St. Tammany Parish, summer is a time for long days spent playing outdoors, easy weekends at the baseball park, and — especially for kids with parents who both work — it means summer camp.

But the expense of camp leaves many families who are struggling financially with no option but to leave their kids unattended. Chassidy Groover of Covington knows what waited for her without an affordable summer camp option.

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The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
6:21 pm
Wed May 22, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — Part One

We've collected the first five episodes of our ongoing environmental series The Louisiana Coast: Last Call into one podcast.

You can play the stories on this page, right click on the player and select "Save As" to download it, or find all of our last call podcasts here:

iTunes
Other Players

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Music
4:20 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Professional Street Musicians Undaunted By Second-Line Shooting

The TBC Brass Band performing during a second-line parade this past weekend.
Maureen McMurray WWNO

The Mother’s Day shootings, which injured 20, rattled residents of New Orleans and led some to question the security around second-line parades. For many, the prevailing tradition brought them out to yesterday’s Divine Ladies Parade, but for the professional musicians who participate in the parades it was also a matter of their livelihood.

“This is how I eat. This is how I feed my family. Without this, I have to go look for another job. I never worked a day in my life. I play music all the time,” says Chris Terro, a percussionist with the TBC Brass Band.

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The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
1:32 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Live Chat Tuesday: Talk To Bob Marshall About Challenges Facing Coastal Louisiana

Last week, we began a series on the crisis facing the Louisiana coast, reported by The Lens’ Bob Marshall and produced by our own Fred Kasten. The stories lay out the causes of Louisiana’s coastal loss and what can be done to reverse it.

Tuesday at 1 p.m., Marshall will participate in a live chat about whether there’s hope for the coast. Is it too late to reverse the accelerating loss of land? Should we spend $50 billion in restoration projects?

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The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
7:45 am
Mon May 20, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — River Diversions

The Davis Pond Freshwater Diversion Structure in 1999 and 2003. The structure part of a project that is attempting to reverse land loss and ecosystem degradation in the marshlands.
Credit NASA Earth Observatory

It’s almost impossible to find anyone in coastal Louisiana opposed to the idea of “coastal restoration.” Storms like Katrina, Gustav and Isaac have shown everyone the value of the marshes and swamps that once stood between them and the Gulf.

But when “restore” means turning things back to the way they once were, problems can arise.

The best-known example of that is the conflict over using river diversions.

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The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
7:45 am
Fri May 17, 2013

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — The Master Plan

Construction of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Surge Barrier in Lake Borgne. The barrier is 1.8 miles long.
Credit Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority

If you’ve been listening and reading along this week, by now you know the consensus among coastal experts is that New Orleans and southeast Louisiana are headed for an early grave before the end of the century.

Because of river levees and damage from oil and gas canals, the wetlands that once protected this city from the Gulf have been reduced by more than half. And now what’s left of this landmass is sinking, at the same time the Gulf is rising due to global warming.

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