features

Thousands of students recently gathered outside the state capitol to protest higher education budget cuts.
Mallory Falk / WWNO

Governor John Bel Edwards has warned that Louisiana's budget crisis likely means even more cuts to higher education — up to $70 million — and big changes to the state's popular scholarship program, TOPS. For local students, that translates to an uncertain future.

The roots of a dead oak tree are all that holds the edge of this ancient Native American mound together.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The loss of Louisiana’s coast due to saltwater intrusion, sea level rise and industry is a big problem for the environment and the economy. But it could also change our understanding of the state’s history. In some places, the water is taking with it ancient Native American sites, posing challenges for archaeologists.

Dr. Michael White.
Derek Bridges / Music Inside Out

What do you hear when he plays his clarinet?

 

Can you hear the bayou? The river? The French Quarter? People sitting on their stoops waiting for someone to deliver the news? Penny parties?

That’s not a clarinet in the doctor’s hands; it’s a time machine.  

The Purple Knights pose on the court; Harold Sylvester is kneeling next to his coach.
Harold Sylvester / Amistad Research Center

TriPod -- New Orleans at 300 revisits the first integrated high school sports contest in Louisiana, on February 25, 1965.

Relay Graduate School of Education

Many of New Orleans charter schools are focused on preparation for college, especially for low-income students of color who would be the first in their families to go to college. But what about preparing these students for that big academic and cultural transition?

Reuben Cain and son.
Eve Abrams / Unprisoned

The way our criminal justice system works, there’s a significant cost to just being accused of a crime. Innocent or not, one way or another, you still have to pay. Especially if you have a past.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod goes back to the days when Algiers was a stomping ground for bullfights and other forms of animal combat.

It’s a Sunday afternoon. The sun is out, you’ve already gone to church, and you’re not sure what to do next. Then you find out the ferry to cross the river to Algiers is running at half rate, on account of a sporting event. A fight. Between a bull. And a grizzly bear.

Fats Domino & Dave Bartholomew.
The Historic New Orleans Collection

At first, there wasn’t a name for the kind of music that Fats Domino played.

He called it rhythm and blues. But Domino’s songs stretched beyond that category.  

Waiting for traffic court at the New Orleans Mission.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Our ongoing series Unprisoned has been bringing you stories of how mass incarceration affects New Orleans.

Last time, we learned about New Orleans Municipal Court, the largest criminal court in Louisiana. Today, we follow Municipal Court to the New Orleans Mission — where a large number of homeless people who are facing municipal charges are being served directly.

An inmate in the new Orleans Parish Prison.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

The Listening Post is teaming up with the Unprisoned project, a new media initiative by award winning independent radio producer Eve Abrams. We want to understand better how jails and prisons impact society here in Louisiana, where 1 in 75 residents are incarcerated, the highest rate in the world.

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