features

Coastal Desk
12:10 pm
Thu October 30, 2014

The Other Industry That's Too Big to Fail

A house in the Gentilly neighborhood, left unrepaired since Hurricane Katrina.
Eve Troeh

The New Jersey Sandy recovery service center had so few chairs that some customers had to wait while standing in long lines. The firm used software taken off the Internet and full of bugs. Homeowners were directed to make appointments through a call center, but employees were never told when they would show up.

That is what Sandy victims faced when they came to one of nine intake centers set up to distribute long-term federal aid to homeowners, David, a former employee, said. He said he and his colleagues wanted to help, but met repeated obstacles.

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Music
1:39 pm
Wed October 29, 2014

Who Sang It First? Mockingbirds And Musicians Cover Each Other In New Orleans

A short phrase New Orleans musicians use to communicate is identical to a common mockingbird call.
Sven Halling Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 23, 2014 6:47 pm

In certain New Orleans music scenes, there is a special sound — a signal — that lets players know it's time to pick up their instruments and strike up the band.

"It's a bugle call, or a band call, to assemble," trumpeter Leroy Jones says.

"It's like: C'mon, rally," musician Matt Bell adds. "Come to the bandstand and be ready to do it. Let's go."

The four-note phrase, however, doesn't belong to musicians alone. Another common New Orleans species, the mockingbird, also produces the call.

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Education
4:17 am
Sun October 26, 2014

A New Orleans Family's Lives Changed In An Instant

Five-year-old Kyle Romain sits on the lap of his grandmother, Barbara Romain, at a football game. Kyle lost his sight when he was hit by a stray bullet two months ago.
Eric Westervelt/NPR

Originally published on Sun October 26, 2014 3:38 pm

NPR Ed is reporting this year on the extraordinary changes in the New Orleans schools.

I was in New Orleans to report on how the city's nearly all-charter school system is handling children with disabilities and special needs.

An old friend, a veteran New Orleans reporter, told me about a family — a mother and her two youngest sons — who'd been badly wounded in a drive-by shooting just days into the new school year.

I met up with Alanna Romain at a recreation league football game at City Park. She has five children. Her oldest boy plays football.

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Louisiana Eats!
5:00 am
Fri October 24, 2014

Halloween Treats That Are Beyond Delicious

Credit Flickr/Valentina Powers

On this week’s Louisiana Eats! we speak to Manbo Sallie Ann Glassman about the role food plays in ceremonial vodou, chat with Mary Ann Winkowski about her ability to speak with the departed, and learn about rituals, mojo bags, and herbal remedies from Miriam Chamani.

Plus, Scott Gold throws a Halloween party and Chris Jay visits the Grill of the Dead in Shreveport. 

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Coastal Desk
3:55 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Coastal Rundown: NOLA Gets Philly

Dale Thayer
Credit Dale Thayer

In September, a delegation of local officials traveled to Austin to learn how they manage their water. Earlier this month, members of that same delegation visited Philadelphia for another take on urban water management and green infrastructure.

Who Was There: Dale Thayer

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Coastal Desk
8:14 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Philadelphia Gets Its Water Management Act Together, And New Orleans Takes Notes

The ribbon cutting of the new Venice Island facility in Manayunk, Philadelphia.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

In September, a delegation of local officials traveled to Austin to learn how they manage their water. New Orleans is preparing to adopt a new Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance which, if passed, will include the city’s first ever stormwater management plan.

Earlier this month, members of that same delegation visited Philadelphia for another take on urban water management and green infrastructure.

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WRKF
6:02 am
Thu October 23, 2014

Louisiana's Minority District Makes For a Congressman On The Move

Congressman Cedric Richmond walks in Southern University's homecoming parade.

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 11:13 am

Louisiana’s 2nd congressional district, which encompasses North Baton Rouge and a large part of New Orleans, is what’s called a majority minority district. In this case, it’s predominantly black. Districts like this are required by federal law to protect minority representation, but ironically, it may be doing the opposite.

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Coastal Desk
9:29 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

A Tale Of Two Coastal Towns Part 2: Plaquemines Parish

Braithwaite, Louisiana, a town on the East Bank of Plaquemines Parish
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

For the first 50 years of his life Donald Stokes lived happily in Braithwaite, a town of a few hundred residents in Plaquemines Parish. In 2006 he and his wife decided to leave.

Stokes says it was such a painful departure that it took him two years to actually complete the move. “Slowly but surely I put stuff on a trailer, came back, put stuff on a trailer, came back. It wasn't easy. It felt like I was uprooting my life.”

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Coastal Desk
9:01 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

A Tale Of Two Coastal Towns Part 1: Staten Island

A Hurricane Sandy damaged house in Staten Island scheduled for demolition.
Credit Elizabeth Rush

Low-lying coastal areas are the front lines for sea level rise, and increasingly frequent and destructive storms at sea. Hurricane Sandy proved it’s not just the South or the Gulf Coast at risk. Staten Island, one of New York City’s five boroughs, saw heavy flooding after Hurricane Sandy, which hit two years ago this month.

The way Eddie Perez tells it, the night of October 29, 2012 played out like one of those movies about the apocalypse. "About 7:55 I was watching the news and they said at 8 o’clock it was coming"

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Out To Lunch
1:00 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Out To Lunch: French Market Film Market

Jolene Pinder and Jon Smith.

When you're the CEO of a company you're principally required to make money. Then there's a whole other kind of business leadership, where things aren't quite so black and white.

Peter's guests on this episode of Out to Lunch inhabit a business world where they're supposed to make money and juggle often conflicting demands of politics, the local and tourist economy, the public good, urban history, and entertainment.

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