features

Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Wed June 4, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Greg Miller

Greg Miller.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Arts & Culture
10:44 am
Tue June 3, 2014

An Artists' Playhouse Opens Doors For Kids In Need

The CASA Jefferson Playhouse will be raffled June 20 to benefit the Court-Appointed Special Advocates program. It sits at the Winn-Dixie store on Carrollton Avenue until the winner is announced.
Emily Remington

Wheel your cart into the Winn-Dixie on Carrollton Avenue, and you might be distracted from your grocery list by a house. Just inside the supermarket sits a bright cottage, typically New Orleans in style.

“It’s got the front porch, it’s got the hip roof and the chimney up top. And everything is crooked,” says Matthew Holdren. The designer and woodworker built this pint-sized home, a children’s playhouse about 9-by-5 feet in size. Its just-might-topple-over feel was inspired by collaborator Terrance Osborne.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: John Taylor

John Taylor.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp.” Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
9:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?

Destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned the Bayou Bienvenue freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, leaving mostly just open water.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

Read more
Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Amanda Moore

Amanda Moore.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Louisiana Eats!
5:00 am
Sat May 31, 2014

A Taste Of Home: Finding Cultural Identity At The Table

A nine year old Polish boy shucks oysters in 1911. Of all the things newcomers bring with them to American soil, food offers a direct connection to their homelands.
Credit National Archives and Records Adminstrators\Lewis Hine

Whether they’re short trips across town or long voyages across the oceans, we all take journeys. On this week’s Louisiana Eats! we’ll speak with writers and restaurateurs about their personal quests for cultural identity.

Kim Sunee’s appetites include travel, knowledge and food. Her trip to Korea is one of the main topics she writes about in A Mouthful of Stars, which explores another dimension of Kim’s creativity: her poetry.

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Media
6:53 pm
Fri May 30, 2014

An Old-Fashioned Newspaperman Takes The Helm In A Digital World

The Times is making headlines for more than just its change in leadership; an internal review, which leaked to the press earlier this month, was intensely critical about how the newspaper has adapted to the digital era.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 3:49 pm

The New York Times' new executive editor, Dean Baquet, took over just two weeks ago, yet he appears perfectly comfortable in his perch atop the worlds of journalism and New York. He smokes fine cigars to relax, wears elegant loafers and excuses his decision to keep his suit coat on during our conversation by saying that's just who he is.

But Baquet's identity is wrapped up in a city and a different reality more than 1,000 miles away.

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Arts & Culture
7:02 am
Fri May 30, 2014

Which Came First: The Mockingbird Or The Musician?

Library of Congress

In certain worlds of New Orleans music, there is a special sound — a signal — which lets players know it's time to pick up their instruments and strike up the band. But where did this signal come from? We listened to chirps, whistles and musicians, hunting for this signal's origins and to learn: what is the chicken, and what is the egg?

When New Orleans musicians want to say a certain thing, instead of words, they use a four note phrase.  

“It’s a bugle call or a band call to assemble,” explains Leroy Jones.

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Notes From New Orleans
7:00 am
Fri May 30, 2014

A Doctor Without Borders Calls New Orleans Home

Dr. Adi Nadimpalli works all over the world, but he says his heart is in New Orleans.
Adi Nadimpalli

War brings countless injuries to the human condition. One of the most devastating consequences of conflict is disruption of basic medical services. These days it seems there are more and more stories on the radio and in newspapers about brave medical teams going into war-torn areas to treat the wounded and the needy.

On this week’s Notes from New Orleans, Sharon Litwin talks with one physician who calls New Orleans home when he’s not on a mission with Doctors Without Borders.

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Listening Post NOLA
7:00 am
Thu May 29, 2014

The Listening Post Asks: Is Housing Affordable In New Orleans?

Housing costs in New Orleans have risen steadily over the past few years.

Every week WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week's topic is the rising cost of housing.

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