features

Listening Post NOLA
7:05 am
Thu November 20, 2014

The Listening Post Asks: What's Your Side Hustle?

A listener texted us this picture of a classic side hustle: bartending.
GroundSource

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post asks: what's your side hustle? What do you do to make extra cash? 

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Education
10:47 am
Tue November 18, 2014

Voices From The Classroom: Young Audiences Charter School

Young Audience school leader Folwell Dunbar teaches core subjects using the arts.
Credit Young Audiences Charter School

Editor's note: With Voices from the Classroom: The Arts in Education Reform, NolaVie and cultural partner WWNO — New Orleans Public Radio are teaming up to take a look at how the arts are being used creatively in schools around the city.

Why are the arts an important component for school curricula? And how are we integrating arts into local classrooms? Today, Renee Peck interviews Folwell Dunbar, head of a new kind of school in Jefferson Parish.

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Community Impact
7:40 am
Tue November 18, 2014

Eden House Provides Refuge For Victims Of Sex Traficking

Residents of Eden House select wht paintings to hang in their rooms in order to personalize them.
Eden House

Eden House is a two-year residential program for women who have been commercially and sexually exploited.  Modeled after Magdalene House in Nashville, Tennessee, Eden House provides six to eight women a safe and supportive home for two years, free of cost.

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The Salt
8:51 am
Mon November 17, 2014

In The Big Easy, Food Vendors Create A Little Honduras

Taqueria La Delicia is a lonchera, or food truck, that parks near a Lowe's Home Improvement store in New Orleans. The owner is Honduran, and so are many of the day laborers who eat there.
Laine Kaplan-Levenson WWNO

Originally published on Mon October 20, 2014 4:31 pm

Thanks to a quirk of history — and a love of bananas — New Orleans has had a Honduran population for more than a century. But that population exploded after Hurricane Katrina, when the jobs needed to rebuild the city drew waves of Honduran immigrants. Many of them stayed, and nearly a decade later, they've established a thriving — if somewhat underground — culinary community.

Signs of that community abound, if you know where to look.

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Coastal Desk
10:13 am
Fri November 14, 2014

Reporter's Notebook: WWNO In Saigon

Saigon bridge.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City, also known as Saigon, has become an Asian mega-city. And it’s surrounded and defined by water. Districts here are often separated by bridges, crossing one of the many rivers that run through the city on their way to the Mekong Delta. It’s a bustling place, as you’d expect with eight million or so residents (and growing). Rush hour brings an onslaught of motorbikes and cars, flowing like their own river through the city.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
2:15 pm
Tue November 11, 2014

A. J. Croce Is Telling Tales

A.J. Croce.
Credit Shelby Duncan

It’s easy to tease out the artists who’ve inspired A.J. Croce’s singing over the years — Ray Charles, Paul McCartney*, Buddy Holly, even Ray Davies of The Kinks. He loves early rock n roll and R&B. So perhaps it’s ironic that A.J. rarely sounds like his father, singer-songwriter Jim Croce, who made his mark on music in the late 1960s and early 70s.

With nine albums to his credit and more than 20 years as a touring musician, A.J. Croce is his own man, performing his own music. And a devoted fan base has shown its appreciation for the genre-busting of the younger Croce.

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Community
3:20 pm
Fri November 7, 2014

Cityscapes: When St. Bernard Made Cars

The 1922 Ford Assembly plant in Arabi, St. Bernard Parish
TheHenryFord.org

In this month's Cityscapes column for NOLA.com and The Times-Picayune, geographer Richard Campanella chooses another industrial subject. The Ford Motor Co. plant in Arabi, along the Mississippi River in St. Bernard Parish, employed hundreds of local workers, starting in the early 1920s.

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Music
5:08 pm
Thu November 6, 2014

Drummer And Tuba Player Work To Stay Sharp For Band And College

The Sonic Boom of the South at Jackson State isn't just a band; it's the university's most visible marketing tool.
Keith O'Brien NPR

Originally published on Thu November 6, 2014 5:44 pm

Six months ago, we brought you the story of the Edna Karr High School marching band in New Orleans. Two members of the band in particular, snare drummer Charles Williams and tuba player Nicholas Nooks, or Big Nick as his friends call him, earned scholarships to Jackson State University in Mississippi — their dream.

The marching band at Jackson State is known as the Sonic Boom of the South. Band camp began in August with 164 freshmen. But after weeks of late nights and early mornings, musical training and also push-ups, 24 had quit.

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Music Inside Out with Gwen Thompkins
2:11 pm
Thu November 6, 2014

Rebirth Brass Band: Feel Like Funkin' It Up

Rebirth Brass Band at Underground Arts in January 2014.
Credit Wendy McCardle / MusicInsideOut.org

This is not John Philip Sousa’s band music. Don’t get us wrong, Sousa is in the pantheon of them-who-haul-brass-through-the-streets, but we suspect the maestro might be surprised by the music today. Which, if you think about it, is good.

Otherwise, there would only be the old-timey brass band idiom and the genre would have lost touch with the people.

Which is precisely where this music has always lived. With military bands and civic orchestras and parades and funerals and weddings, brass band music has always been popular music.

And in New Orleans, it still is.

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Coastal Desk
8:50 am
Thu November 6, 2014

WWNO's Coastal Glossary

Aerial view of wetlands
Credit U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services / Wikimedia Commons

As we explore the Gulf Coast more comprehensively than ever before, trying to understand better the complex relationships inherent in the restoration process, there's a lot to learn and keep track of.

In order to both understand and talk about coastal erosion, an expanded vocabulary is needed — one filled with brand-new terms whose definitions are integral to absorbing the problems and solutions Louisiana faces around water and land loss.

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