Features

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Heights Therapy Center offers a unique treatment option for people with disabilities and special needs in South Louisiana. The Folsom-based center connects participants with the experience of horse riding as a form of therapeutic interaction.

On a sunny Saturday morning, fifteen-year-old Louis Knights took the reigns of a tan mare named Sonny and gently led her into the arena, with the help of his instructor.

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Highly Flammable'

Jul 1, 2015
David Falconer / WWNO

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and other intimate spaces within the community. Each month, seven storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Raising kids is hard work. The St. Tammany Parish Parenting Center in Covington helps parents from all backgrounds face those challenges and take pride in the role they play in their children’s lives, and it’s also a place to socialize and find camaraderie.

On a recent weekday evening toys were scattered across the carpet and children played while parents filed in after work to support each other and learn how to be the best parents they can be.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Churches of several denominations are coming together to address an often invisible problem on the Northshore: family homelessness.

Nineteen churches decided to pool their resources and host homeless families in need. They take turns hosting the families at each church and rotate every week, providing food, childcare, counseling services and transportation, to help the family get back on their feet.

Well, technically it’s 13 for now, there’s a baby on the way.

courtesy of the Holden Family Collection

Most Americans hear the phrase “slave trade” and picture ships sailing across the Atlantic Ocean, with captured Africans chained inside, terrorized and sick. But twice as many people were sold in the domestic slave trade, which forcibly moved over a million people, primarily from the Upper South to the Lower South, primarily over land and on foot.

After the United States outlawed international slave trading in 1808, New Orleans became home to the nation’s largest domestic slave market.

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Myrtle & Malpa'

May 27, 2015
Aubrey Edwards

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and other intimate spaces within the community. Each month, seven storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Fred Benenson / Flickr

Fusion writer Cara Rose DeFabio has earned the unofficial title of "emoji scholar." That's because DeFabio pays very close attention to the details of how people use emojis to express emotion in text messages and to represent their unique identities online.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Thrifty shoppers often seek hidden treasures and surprises at thrift stores. But visitors at one store outside New Orleans can also help stray animals.

The St. Francis Animal Sanctuary thrift store offers a unique gathering place for the Mandeville community — a room full of happy cats.
 

Sometimes customers are surprised when they notice one corner of the St. Francis Animal Sanctuary thrift store is screened off. It holds about 20 cats, who lounge around and play with one another while volunteers sit in recliners and pet them.

Ras Asan

Derrius Quarles and Ras Asan are co-founders of the education funding start-up Million Dollar Scholar.

Growing up in Chicago with few resources, Derrius Quarles shocked everyone when he took the initiative and won over a million dollars in scholarships and awards to attend college. As an undergraduate at Morehouse College, he met Ras Asan, and the two decided to take Derrius' know-how to more students who could use it.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Every week in Old Mandeville, the gray stucco train depot comes alive for the Mandeville Trailhead Community Market. Sponsored by the city, it saw about 24,000 visitors last year and hosts about 60 vendors every Saturday.

The market is a place to buy local crafts, soap, honey, baked goods and plants. Plus, it provides many with companionship and community.

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