farming

Cookie Coleman, Poppy Tooker and Chef Hardette Harris in Shreveport
Chris Jay

From community gardens in North Louisiana to village farms in Sub-Saharan Africa, local leaders are cultivating a passion for regional cuisine and sustainable agriculture. On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we learn about the push for community-driven food policy and meet some advocates who are inspiring people to think differently about how they eat.

Royal Bream raises fish in a floating net in Marseille, France. This represents one type of farming technologies that could work in the Gulf.
NOAA, with permission from Giles Lemarchand.

Last month the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration opened the Gulf of Mexico for fish farming, or aquaculture. Now, some fishermen and environmentalists have filed a lawsuit against NOAA.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Most of the fish we eat in the U.S. comes from other countries. Fishermen in Louisiana have long sought to displace some of those imports but the industry has faced challenges like hurricanes and the 2010 BP oil spill.

Now, a new source of fish in the gulf offers promise -- but also raises questions.

Weenta Girmay

State officials want landowners to convert old farmland to wetlands. The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for its Agricultural Conservation Easement Program.

Joe Shriner

On this week's episode of Louisiana Eats!, we visit two Gulf Coast farms where, through collaboration and innovation, farmers are creating better products that will help preserve the environment and give back to the community.

Shreveport-Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we're celebrating our one-year anniversary on the airwaves of Red River Radio by highlighting the burgeoning food scene of northern Louisiana. We tour Mahaffey Farms with innovative farmer Evan McCommon and even get to meet his heritage breed pigs and chickens.

NOAA

A federal judge has been ordered to review his decision on the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

More than 150 timber landowners are participating in Tuesday’s Central Louisiana Forestry Forum. LSU AgCenter forestry extension agent Robbie Hutchins organized the meeting. He says the state’s timber industry has fully recovered from the 2008 financial crisis, due in large part to an emerging market for woody biomass.

“Forestry has bounced back and is now stronger than ever. That’s a great plus for Louisiana. But the big thing for us as forest landowners is the opportunity for alternate markets, nontraditional markets to market our resource,” Hutchins said.

Vishal

Strawberry farmers are bracing for Wednesday night's cold snap.

WBRZ-TV reports that crews worked to cover their strawberries and protect them from the cold weather moving in.

Farmers say if temperatures get too cold and stay there for too long, they could be facing a total loss of their crops.

Lows are forecast to be around 20 degrees in southern Louisiana and stay in the 20s for the next two or three days, with the potential for freezing rain later in the week.

Eve Abrams

VEGGI is a community member owned and operated farmer’s cooperative based out of New Orleans East, Louisiana. VEGGI Farmer's Cooperative is dedicated to empowering growers in the Greater New Orleans area, starting in New Orleans East, in order to create sustainable, high quality jobs that enhance the quality of life of communities through increasing local food access and promotion of sustainable agriculture. 


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