Bob Engel, Chef Liaison of Gourmet Mushrooms, shows off a bottle filled with sawdust and mycelium while giving a tour of the farm.
Terry McCarthy

On this week's show, we're looking at farming across the state and the Americas.

We begin on the West Coast, with a tour of Gourmet Mushrooms in Sonoma County, California, where they are mimicking natural growing conditions to cultivate specialty mushrooms indoors. This farm harvests eight different varieties of organic mushrooms for food wholesalers, gourmet grocers, and restaurants all across America.

Eve Troeh

This week on All Things New Orleans, we get into Cajun country rice fields with Tegan Wendland, for an update on ruined crops after the 2016 Louisiana floods. Public policy lawyer Jeffrey Thomas has made disaster a bigger part of his work after the levee failures of Katrina. He talks about the road ahead for long-term recovery and using federal funds to help flooded communities.

Cookie Coleman, Poppy Tooker and Chef Hardette Harris in Shreveport
Chris Jay

From community gardens in North Louisiana to village farms in Sub-Saharan Africa, local leaders are cultivating a passion for regional cuisine and sustainable agriculture. On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we learn about the push for community-driven food policy and meet some advocates who are inspiring people to think differently about how they eat.

Royal Bream raises fish in a floating net in Marseille, France. This represents one type of farming technologies that could work in the Gulf.
NOAA, with permission from Giles Lemarchand.

Last month the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration opened the Gulf of Mexico for fish farming, or aquaculture. Now, some fishermen and environmentalists have filed a lawsuit against NOAA.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Most of the fish we eat in the U.S. comes from other countries. Fishermen in Louisiana have long sought to displace some of those imports but the industry has faced challenges like hurricanes and the 2010 BP oil spill.

Now, a new source of fish in the gulf offers promise -- but also raises questions.

Weenta Girmay

State officials want landowners to convert old farmland to wetlands. The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for its Agricultural Conservation Easement Program.

Joe Shriner

On this week's episode of Louisiana Eats!, we visit two Gulf Coast farms where, through collaboration and innovation, farmers are creating better products that will help preserve the environment and give back to the community.

Shreveport-Bossier Convention and Tourist Bureau

On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we're celebrating our one-year anniversary on the airwaves of Red River Radio by highlighting the burgeoning food scene of northern Louisiana. We tour Mahaffey Farms with innovative farmer Evan McCommon and even get to meet his heritage breed pigs and chickens.


A federal judge has been ordered to review his decision on the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

More than 150 timber landowners are participating in Tuesday’s Central Louisiana Forestry Forum. LSU AgCenter forestry extension agent Robbie Hutchins organized the meeting. He says the state’s timber industry has fully recovered from the 2008 financial crisis, due in large part to an emerging market for woody biomass.

“Forestry has bounced back and is now stronger than ever. That’s a great plus for Louisiana. But the big thing for us as forest landowners is the opportunity for alternate markets, nontraditional markets to market our resource,” Hutchins said.