Louisiana Sea Grant College Program at Louisiana State University

The state is bringing back its program to test fish for mercury, a heavy metal that is dangerous for human consumption. The program will be back up and running in January.

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality scaled back the program in 2008, when it ran out of funding.

Mercury comes from burning coal and other industrial activities. It gets into the air and then settles in streams and other waters, where fish absorb it.


The 10th Annual Louisiana Smart Growth Summit explores best practices for statewide planning. The Center for Planning and Excellence, CPEX, runs the event Tuesday and Wednesday in Baton Rouge.

CPEX CEO Elizabeth Boo Thomas says what Louisiana really needs is transportation and housing.

The Tulane Environmental Studies Program joins with WWNO and the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic for the fourth event in its series on “The Katrina Disaster Now”: a conversation about rising seas, sinking land, climate change, Louisiana, justice, and community – featuring leaders from diverse communities across the Louisiana coast in an event moderated by NPR National Correspondent Debbie Elliott.

The Army Corps of Engineers is proposing a new way to measure the value of wetlands and restore those destroyed by industry.

The proposed Louisiana Wetlands Rapid Assessment Method, or LRAM, is a compensatory wetland mitigation method that will help them evaluate different types of wetlands, like bottomland hardwoods or cypress swamp, and determine how to offset destruction caused by development.

If a company wants to build in the wetlands it has to replace what is destroyed.

Out To Lunch: Oil And Gusts
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Everybody likes to think they’re important, but here in Louisiana we really are. Two sectors of our local economy are major components of the national, and global, economy: oil and gas, and renewable energy.

Outside of the oil companies who physically drill for oil, there is a huge industry of companies who do everything else – from building oil rigs to delivering groceries to the men and women who work on them. One of the biggest offshore support companies in the world is headquartered here in New Orleans. Tidewater.


The state announced on Wednesday that it will divert water from the Mississippi River to rebuild eroding wetlands in Plaquemines Parish.

The Mid-Barataria and Mid-Breton diversions are the first two projects of this scale.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

It turns out Louisiana's climate is a lot like Sub-Saharan Africa's. So it makes some sense you’d see animals usually spotted on safari at Global Wildlife -- an animal refuge on the Northshore in Folsom. There, visitors can learn about 4,000 exotic, endangered and threatened animals from all over the world.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers / http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil

Staving off coastal land loss in Louisiana will take lots of money and lots of manpower. In just the next four years, GNO Inc. expects up to 12,000 new jobs in the so-called “water sector,” like coastal restoration managers and mathematicians who can model water flow.


But there are not enough workers in the region with the skills to fill those jobs. The new University of New Orleans certificate in Coastal Engineering and Science aims to remedy that.

A report released Tuesday says Louisiana is using too much natural gas. The Union of Concerned Scientists rates states based on their reliance on natural gas. Louisiana is among the most at-risk.

Tulane University

A proposal to build a new coal export terminal in Plaquemines Parish has drawn criticism from environmental groups and the public, who say it presents a public health threat. It has been so contentious that the state Department of Natural Resources has faced lawsuits and is currently reviewing its approval of the project after taking input from the public.