environment

Red River Radio
8:45 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Shreveport agency recruits nearly 1,200 volunteers for litter removal

Scores of volunteers will take to the streets and waterways Saturday to pick up litter as part of the Great American Cleanup.

In Louisiana, 15 chapters of Keep Louisiana Beautiful have organized clean-up efforts. Shreveport Green executive director Donna Curtis says her organization has rallied nearly 1,200 volunteers from dozens of organizations to help the beautification cause, her largest ever one-day volunteer recruitment.

Over the past 24 years of Shreveport Green’s existence, according to Curtis, this one day has made a measurable difference.

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BP Oil Spill
7:00 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Gulf Health: 4 Years After The Oil Spill

Oiled beaches in coastal Jefferson Parish after the BP oil spill.
Credit Jason Saul / WWNO

National Wildlife Federation experts warn Gulf species are still suffering from oil spill effects.

This story has been updated with a response from BP.

As the four-year anniversary of the BP oil spill approaches, a leading environmental group is warning that the event is far from over. Increased deaths of dolphins, sea turtles and other injured species are signs of continuing contamination.

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WRKF
4:51 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Landrieu Says Revenue Sharing, Not Lawsuit, Will Benefit Coastal Renewal

Sen. Mary Landrieu spoke at the Baton Rouge Press Club Monday.

Senator Mary Landrieu says a lawsuit against oil and gas companies is not the answer to renewing Louisiana’s gulf coast.

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NolaVie
4:50 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Managing Menhaden: A New Plan For 'The Most Important Fish In The Sea'

A school of Menhaden fish.
Crabby Taxonomist flickr.com

They’re called bunker up north, and Pogies here in the South, and are sometimes referred to as “The Most Important Fish In the Sea”. These are the Menhaden.

Since it’s not a fish you eat, you’ve probably never heard of it. But the annual Menhaden Advisory Committee meeting was a big deal this year due to a new Menhaden management plan.

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Latest News
4:30 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

Study: Funding Master Plan Would Create Jobs

According to a new study, funding Louisiana's master plan for the coast will bring jobs and other economic benefits.
Arthur Belala Wikimedia Commons

A study commissioned by an environmental group says funding the state's multi-billion-dollar, 50-year plan for coastal protection and restoration would create anywhere from 109,000 to 212,000 permanent jobs while spurring the economy with billions in spending related to the projects.

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Listening Post NOLA
7:00 am
Thu March 27, 2014

The Listening Post Asks: What Do You Know About Coastal Erosion?

Every year 25 square miles of wetlands disappear from Louisiana's coast.
Jesse Hardman

Every week WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week's topic is coastal erosion.

Louisiana has 40 percent of the nation’s wetlands. A combination of man-made and environmental factors are causing more than 25 square miles of that area to disappear annually.

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Environment
4:38 pm
Wed March 26, 2014

Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Brings 'Bad Juju' And Pain 25 Years Later

Scott Pegau, a scientist at the Prince William Sound Science Center, studies the effects of spilled oil on the environment in Cordova, Alaska.
Debbie Elliott NPR

Originally published on Wed March 26, 2014 8:54 pm

At Ross Mullins' home in Cordova, Alaska, you have to slam the front door extra hard to make it close. The former commercial fisherman lives in a small wood-frame house that's in need of repair. Some of the windows are cracked and he leaves the water faucets dripping to protect uninsulated pipes from the harsh Alaskan winter.

When the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground and started leaking oil 25 years ago, the disaster drastically changed the fishing industry in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Mullins has never recovered from that blow.

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Environment
10:08 am
Wed March 26, 2014

Leeville Arts And Heritage Festival Draws Attention To Disappearing Town

Leeville Arts and Heritage Festival

Leeville, Louisiana is at the southern tip of Bayou Lafourche, along Louisiana state Highway 1. Recent decades have seen the town all but wash away, due to coastal erosion.

This Saturday, March 29, marks the first ever Leeville Arts and Heritage Festival. Janet Rhodus is the executive director of Launch Leeville, a nonprofit founded to promote the town. The Baton Rouge resident described her first trip to Leeville.

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Environment
4:07 am
Mon March 24, 2014

25 Years After Spill, Alaska Town Struggles Back From 'Dead Zone'

Orca Inlet, Cordova's fishing harbor, on a blustery day this month. Commercial fishing is the small Alaskan town's primary industry.
Marisa Peñaloza NPR

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:25 am

On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the pristine water. At the time, it was the single biggest spill in U.S. history. In a series of stories, NPR is examining the lasting social and economic impacts of the disaster, as well as the policy, regulation and scientific research that came out of it.

It's a blustery, snowy March day when Michelle Hahn O'Leary offers a tour of Cordova, Alaska, situated on the eastern shore of Prince William Sound.

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Environment
3:08 pm
Sun March 23, 2014

Why The Exxon Valdez Spill Was A Eureka Moment For Science

An oiled murre passes the darkened shoreline near Prince William Sound, Alaska, less than a month after the March 1989 spill.
Erik Hill Anchorage Daily News/MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 10:36 am

On March 24, 1989, the tanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into the pristine water. At the time, it was the single biggest spill in U.S. history. In a series of stories, NPR is examining the lasting social and economic impacts of the disaster, as well as the policy, regulation and scientific research that came out of it.

Twenty-five years of research following the Exxon Valdez disaster has led to some startling conclusions about the persistent effects of spilled oil.

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