environment

Monique Verdin / http://moniquemverdin.com

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu is pledging to reduce the city’s emissions and invest in its ability to cope with extreme weather caused by climate change. By signing the Compact of Mayors in Paris last week, Landrieu joins 20 other mayors pledging to do things like build more bike lanes, get people to use LED lights and build energy-efficient buildings. New Orleans is already part of the 100 Resilient Cities project and has developed a plan to improve water management and decrease emissions.

A group of indigenous people from all over the world led a kayak flotilla through a canal in central Paris.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Indigenous people want their voices to be heard during the international climate talks. They are rallying in Paris, saying their communities and interests are not fully represented in the official negotiations. Indigenous groups want legally-binding language that protects their way of life in the wake of climate change.

From right, United Houma Nation first lady Noreen Dardar and principle chief Thomas Dardar with other members of the Gulf South Rising delegation from Louisiana. Dardar is in Paris seeking support for his coastal Louisiana tribe.
Monique Verdin / http://moniquemverdin.com

International leaders continue negotiations Monday at the climate talks in Paris, and some Louisianans are there to advocate for their communities. One of those is principle chief of the United Houma Nation, Thomas Dardar.

The Houma have long inhabited south Louisiana but are not federally recognized as a Native American tribe, partly because the government requires that tribes have a central base, but the Houma population is very spread out.

Wind-power trees, part of many installations at COP21 in Paris.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

In Paris, international climate change negotiations continue. Drafts of the negotiating text are circulating, as the delegates meet in working groups behind closed doors. Meanwhile governments and agencies are releasing new reports and studies to highlight the serious impact of climate change. That includes new information on how climate change affects basic human survival through food production.

Thousands of fish were killed by a red tide along Southwest Florida's Gulf Coast during a 2002 bloom. Red tide blooms can wreak havoc on local communities dealing with tourism losses or the cost of cleanup.
Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA)

The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association has released a new plan that will help protect humans and marine life from certain toxins. It sounds like the title of this holiday season’s biggest horror film at the box office -- The attack of the Harmful Algal Bloom!

From Paris: The World Agrees To Save Trees

Dec 3, 2015
Le Bourget, site of the UN climate change talks near Paris.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The international climate talks continue in Paris this week and one of the hot topics has been deforestation. Louisiana cut down many of its forests in the 1800s, and as WWNO’s Tegan Wendland reports, the world has learned from our mistakes.

Protesters on the second day of the United Nations climate change talks in Paris.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Many small island countries are banking on support from the United Nations to help them cope with the impacts of sea level rise and coastal erosion, as a result of climate change. WWNO’s Tegan Wendland reports from Paris on the second day of UN negotiations to reduce global warming. She found that island nations' challenges are similar to those faced here in Louisiana.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The first day of the United Nations international climate talks has wrapped up at the Conference Of the Parties, or COP21, in Paris. As world leaders try to reach an agreement to limit global warming and stave off climate change, Louisiana has a lot at stake.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Climate change and environmental pollution disproportionately impact people of color. In New Orleans, Dr. Beverly Wright is working to change that. She started the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, which is now housed at Dillard University, and has worked for many years to highlight the environmental and health inequities in the Lower Mississippi River Industrial Corridor, commonly referred to as "Cancer Alley."

A marsh restoration project at work.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

There is a federal law that says when wetlands are destroyed by development or industry, they must be replaced somewhere nearby. It is a provision of the Clean Water Act in place since 1980, but it’s getting new attention because of increased industrial development in Louisiana.

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