environment

Latest News
5:57 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Report Says Erosion Is Causing Depopulation Of Coastal Parishes

Coastal parishes are losing residents because of coastal erosion, according to The Data Center of New Orleans.
Lane Lefort U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Commuting statistics indicate that coastal parishes are losing residents because of coastal erosion, according to a new report released Sunday by the New Orleans-based Data Center. And it says those left behind are on average older, poorer or otherwise vulnerable.

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Community
3:41 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Global Green's Holy Cross Village A Model Of Living With Water, Rather Than Fighting It

Each of the five homes in Global Green's Sustainable Village has a rain garden in the front.
Eve Abrams WWNO

Linda Stone is the director of local office of Global Green USA. Jeff Supak works for Global Green on wetlands and water issues. The two give us a tour of the group's Holy Cross Project in the Lower 9th Ward dedicated to sustainable living in New Orleans.

“This is Global Green’s showcase sustainable village,” explains Stone. “We’re in the Holy Cross neighborhood, and we’re right next to the river, as you can see.”

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The Lens
9:53 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Telltale Rainbow Sheens Reveal Thousands Of Unreported Oil Spills In The Gulf

The 300,000 wells drilled in Louisiana are connected by tens of thousands of miles of pipelines that are vulnerable to leaks, like this one in a coastal marsh.
Gulf Restoration Network

Jonathan Henderson of New Orleans-based Gulf Restoration Network is flying Louisiana's coast looking for oil. As usual, he's found some.

"I just noticed something out of the corner of my eye that looks like a sheen that had some form to it," he says. "We're going to go take a closer look and see if there's a rainbow sheen."

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Environment
10:40 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Telltale Rainbow Sheens Show Thousands Of Spills Across The Gulf

The 300,000 wells drilled in Louisiana are connected by tens of thousands of miles of pipelines that are vulnerable to leaks, like this one in a coastal marsh.
Gulf Restoration Network

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:26 am

Jonathan Henderson of New Orleans-based Gulf Restoration Network is flying Louisiana's coast looking for oil. As usual, he's found some.

"I just noticed something out of the corner of my eye that looks like a sheen that had some form to it," he says. "We're going to go take a closer look and see if there's a rainbow sheen."

It's a target-rich environment for Henderson, because more than 54,000 wells were planted in and off this coast — part of the 300,000 wells in the state. They're connected by thousands of miles of pipelines, all vulnerable to leaks.

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Green Minute
7:00 am
Fri April 18, 2014

The Green Minute: Myths Of Recycling, Part One

Bales of crushed plastic.
Credit Michal Maňas / wikimedia commons

New Orleans has had curbside recycling for a few years now, but many people are still skeptical that the city is actually recycling what we leave out for pick up. Do you think that everything you place into your recycling bin is going straight to the trash?

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Environment
7:30 am
Wed April 16, 2014

Barataria Bay, 4 Years After The Deepwater Horizon Disaster

Melanie Driscoll, director of bird conservation for Audubon's Louisiana Coastal Initiative, examines the remains of a Forster's Tern found on Cat Island. The island shows scant signs of life four years after the BP oil spill.
Credit Eileen Fleming / WWNO

As Sunday’s four-year anniversary of the BP oil spill approaches, environmental groups headed out into one of the areas most heavily oiled in the disaster. There, they looked at what effects that oil could be having on wetlands, and inspected the latest damage from coastal erosion, ongoing before and after the spill.

It takes about a half-hour on John Stubbs’ 22-foot fishing boat to get from the Myrtle Grove Marina in Plaquemines Parish to Bay Jimmy in Barataria Bay.

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Environment
2:40 am
Wed April 16, 2014

As La. Coast Recedes, Battle Rages Over Who Should Pay

Man-made canals built for the oil and gas industry cut through wetland. The industry argues those canals aren't to blame for coastal erosion.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 3:33 pm

Louisiana's coast is disappearing at the rate of about a football field an hour. Since the 1930s, the Gulf of Mexico has swallowed up an area the size of Delaware.

You can see the water encroaching in Delacroix in St. Bernard Parish, less than an hour southeast of New Orleans. Here, a narrow crescent of land known locally as the "end of the world" is where the road abruptly comes to a dead end; in the distance, you see the tops of now-submerged trees.

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Environment
3:36 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

For The First Time In 70 Years, Wild Whooping Cranes Have Laid Eggs In Louisiana

A pair of wild Whooping Cranes has produced eggs in Louisiana for the first time in seven decades.
Credit Michael Seymour / LDWF

A mated pair of Whooping Cranes has produced eggs in the Louisiana wild for the first time in 70 years, the state Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced Tuesday.

The announcement, made by LDWF Secretary Robert Barham at the 13th North American Crane Workshop in Lafayette, is a watershed moment in the reintroduction of the endangered birds to the wild. Once widespread, the Whooping Crane population had plummeted to just 21 total birds by the 1940s, mostly due to hunting and the conversion of wetland habitat into agricultural fields.

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Red River Radio
8:45 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Shreveport agency recruits nearly 1,200 volunteers for litter removal

Scores of volunteers will take to the streets and waterways Saturday to pick up litter as part of the Great American Cleanup.

In Louisiana, 15 chapters of Keep Louisiana Beautiful have organized clean-up efforts. Shreveport Green executive director Donna Curtis says her organization has rallied nearly 1,200 volunteers from dozens of organizations to help the beautification cause, her largest ever one-day volunteer recruitment.

Over the past 24 years of Shreveport Green’s existence, according to Curtis, this one day has made a measurable difference.

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BP Oil Spill
7:00 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Gulf Health: 4 Years After The Oil Spill

Oiled beaches in coastal Jefferson Parish after the BP oil spill.
Credit Jason Saul / WWNO

National Wildlife Federation experts warn Gulf species are still suffering from oil spill effects.

This story has been updated with a response from BP.

As the four-year anniversary of the BP oil spill approaches, a leading environmental group is warning that the event is far from over. Increased deaths of dolphins, sea turtles and other injured species are signs of continuing contamination.

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