environment

Green Minute
11:57 am
Fri May 2, 2014

The Myths Of Recycling, Part Three: Don't Shred Paper!

Don't tear the paper! Leave as is, and recycled it will be.
Credit PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay

We’re back with more myths of curbside recycling. Shredded and crumpled paper create a lot of confusion for sorting machines — hard to believe, but true. Sorting mechanisms can’t distinguish crumpled paper from plastic, and ultimately, it just winds up in the trash.

The same goes for shredded paper. The small bits drop through the equipment like water through a colander, and then it drops into the trash piles heading to the landfills. So…?

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Environment
7:18 am
Fri April 25, 2014

New Coastal Index Measures Population Shifts, Economic Opportunity In Changes To Land And Water

Sunset on the Mississippi River, with a view of New Orleans.
NOAA

The Data Center released its first Coastal Index this week. WWNO's Jack Hopke sat down with Executive Director Allison Plyer and Senior Research Fellow George Hobor to learn more.

Among the lessons learned, data since 2005 show many coastal communities, like Chauvin and Dulac, are losing residents. Those choosing to stay are more likely to be poor than those who leave. That means the remaining population is more vulnerable to events like storms, with fewer resources to help them bounce back after disaster.

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Green Minute
5:57 am
Fri April 25, 2014

The Green Minute: Myths Of Recycling, Part Two

Plastic bottles doing what they do when they get recycled.
Credit Hans / pixabay

Welcome to part two of the myths of recycling (here's part one in case you missed it).

Don’t keep a lid on it! That’s right. Plastic caps and lids are small and difficult to sort. They also keep liquids and other contaminants inside the plastic containers. So trash the lids and make sure your plastics are fully cleaned before placing them in your recycling bin.

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WRKF
3:21 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Insight: Gen. Honoré's New Mission -- Fighting Pollution

Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 4:11 pm

Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré gets credit for restoring order in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. And from that, he emerged as a national hero.

Since then, he’s retired and launched headlong into the fight against pollution, gathering the troops in a Green Army.


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The Louisiana Coast: Last Call
5:42 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

WWNO Receives Regional Edward R. Murrow Award For 'Louisiana Coast: Last Call'

89.9 WWNO — New Orleans Public Radio is a regional winner of the prestigious Edward R. Murrow Award for its 2013 news series “Louisiana Coast: Last Call” — reported by Bob Marshall and produced by Fred Kasten, with online digital development by digital director Jason Saul.

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Environment
8:40 am
Tue April 22, 2014

Louisiana Highway 1: The Wild Game Supper Of Larose

Aaron Breaux stirs a pot of alligator sauce piquante at the Wild Game Supper, Larose, Louisiana
Eve Troeh

Louisiana Highway 1, or just LA-1, is the longest continuous road in the state, running from the northeast corner down to Grand Isle. One particular stretch of it poses a particular challenge: as coastal erosion and sea level rise continue at rapid rates in southern Louisiana, LA-1 is more consistently flooded. This leaves residents and anyone who needs to travel the road inconvenienced at best, and in peril at worst.

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Latest News
5:57 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Report Says Erosion Is Causing Depopulation Of Coastal Parishes

Coastal parishes are losing residents because of coastal erosion, according to The Data Center of New Orleans.
Lane Lefort U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Commuting statistics indicate that coastal parishes are losing residents because of coastal erosion, according to a new report released Sunday by the New Orleans-based Data Center. And it says those left behind are on average older, poorer or otherwise vulnerable.

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Community
3:41 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Global Green's Holy Cross Village A Model Of Living With Water, Rather Than Fighting It

Each of the five homes in Global Green's Sustainable Village has a rain garden in the front.
Eve Abrams WWNO

Linda Stone is the director of local office of Global Green USA. Jeff Supak works for Global Green on wetlands and water issues. The two give us a tour of the group's Holy Cross Project in the Lower 9th Ward dedicated to sustainable living in New Orleans.

“This is Global Green’s showcase sustainable village,” explains Stone. “We’re in the Holy Cross neighborhood, and we’re right next to the river, as you can see.”

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The Lens
9:53 am
Sun April 20, 2014

Telltale Rainbow Sheens Reveal Thousands Of Unreported Oil Spills In The Gulf

The 300,000 wells drilled in Louisiana are connected by tens of thousands of miles of pipelines that are vulnerable to leaks, like this one in a coastal marsh.
Gulf Restoration Network

Jonathan Henderson of New Orleans-based Gulf Restoration Network is flying Louisiana's coast looking for oil. As usual, he's found some.

"I just noticed something out of the corner of my eye that looks like a sheen that had some form to it," he says. "We're going to go take a closer look and see if there's a rainbow sheen."

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Environment
10:40 am
Sat April 19, 2014

Telltale Rainbow Sheens Show Thousands Of Spills Across The Gulf

The 300,000 wells drilled in Louisiana are connected by tens of thousands of miles of pipelines that are vulnerable to leaks, like this one in a coastal marsh.
Gulf Restoration Network

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 11:26 am

Jonathan Henderson of New Orleans-based Gulf Restoration Network is flying Louisiana's coast looking for oil. As usual, he's found some.

"I just noticed something out of the corner of my eye that looks like a sheen that had some form to it," he says. "We're going to go take a closer look and see if there's a rainbow sheen."

It's a target-rich environment for Henderson, because more than 54,000 wells were planted in and off this coast — part of the 300,000 wells in the state. They're connected by thousands of miles of pipelines, all vulnerable to leaks.

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