environment

NolaVie
11:21 am
Fri February 20, 2015

From The Mississippi To The Mekong: A Conversation With WWNO's Eve Troeh

A field of green onions, with a structure typical to the rural areas of the Mekong River delta, in the late afternoon near the coast.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

WWNO News Director Eve Troeh visited Vietnam on assignment to report on the effects of climate change in a place with water challenges similar to New Orleans. She says it was an adventure unlike any she has recently experienced.

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Coastal Desk
8:30 pm
Tue February 10, 2015

WWNO's Coastal Glossary

Aerial view of wetlands
Credit U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services / Wikimedia Commons

As we explore the Gulf Coast more comprehensively than ever before, trying to understand better the complex relationships inherent in the restoration process, there's a lot to learn and keep track of.

In order to both understand and talk about coastal erosion, an expanded vocabulary is needed — one filled with brand-new terms whose definitions are integral to absorbing the problems and solutions Louisiana faces around water and land loss.

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Red River Radio
8:25 am
Tue February 10, 2015

Federal funds flow into dredging the Red River

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 10:34 am

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is allocating $2.4 million on top of congressional spending this year for dredging the Red River. The J. Bennett Johnston Waterway Navigation Project received the additional funds for operation and maintenance. The head of the Red River Waterway Commission, Ken Guidry, says the funding is critical to keep industries based at the Port of Caddo-Bossier and the Alexandria Port.

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Coastal Desk
7:16 am
Thu February 5, 2015

Delta Blues Part 3: Better Together

Boat on the river in Can Tho, the largest city in the Mekong Delta.
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Louisiana faces the highest relative rates of sea level rise in the world. As policy and funding debates rage over how to best restore and protect our coastal communities, local leaders also look for allies elsewhere.

On the other side of the globe, Louisiana has found sympathetic ears in Vietnam. That nation also has a below-sea-level region at the mouth of a great river. Increased conversation and meetings aim to find out how shared geography might lead to shared solutions. 

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KEDM
10:48 pm
Wed February 4, 2015

Obama Proposal Would Redirect Coastal Restoration Funds

Workers reflood salt marsh

President Obama is proposing that an offshore revenue sharing plan, set to provide Louisiana millions of dollars in revenue for coastal restoration, be replaced with a plan that would spread that money across the nation for various issues.

  

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Environment
5:16 pm
Tue February 3, 2015

EPA Push For Massive Munitions Burn Ignites Opposition In Louisiana

Melissa Downer and her family moved to Camp Minden, La., 11 years ago and live on three acres. The mother of three young daughters says they'll move if the M6 is burned in the open air.
Kate Archer Kent Red River Radio

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 7:17 pm

Explosions used to be no big deal for residents of sleepy rural towns in north Louisiana's piney woods near the Arkansas border. Blasts meant jobs.

The Army's Camp Minden was the site of a former ammunition factory built during World War II. The factory closed in the 1990s. Still, the place is littered with millions of pounds of leftover artillery waste.

The stuff in question is called M6, a toxic propellant in grenades and artillery rounds. The Army doesn't use it anymore, and tons of M6 are stored in bunkers at Camp Minden.

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Coastal Desk
10:19 am
Thu January 29, 2015

Delta Blues Part 2: When Life Gives You Saltwater, Make Shrimp Ponds

Farmers in Vietnam's Mekong delta adapt to climate change as saltwater creeps onto their land.
Jesse Hardman WWNO

Louisiana faces the highest relative rates of sea level rise in the world. As policy and funding debates rage over how to best restore and protect our coastal communities, local leaders also look for allies elsewhere.

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Coastal Desk
8:25 pm
Tue January 27, 2015

'Blue Carbon Credits' May Be New Way To Fund Coastal Restoration

Sarah Mack of Tierra Resources addresses a crowd at a panel on Coastal Wetland Restoration and Entrepreneurship in Louisiana, held at Propeller on January 27, 2015.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A New Orleans organization is trying to help fund coastal restoration by quantifying Louisiana wetlands, using hard numbers as a way to offset global carbon emissions.

Companies that send lots of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere — such as power plants and oil refineries — need to offset some of that pollution. So they invest in green carbon projects by spending money on things like protecting forests. One Louisiana company wants to expand that tactic to the Gulf Coast.

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Latest News
7:55 am
Mon January 26, 2015

BP Starts Calling Witnesses At Federal Oil Spill Trial

Now it’s BP’s turn in court.

The oil company will be calling witnesses as it makes a case for civil penalties lower than the $13.7 billion the federal government wants from the 2010 oil spill.

The second week of a three-week trial is set to begin today in New Orleans.

Last week, government experts testified about environmental, economic and social damage caused by the spill.

BP attorneys disputed much of that testimony, and have argued the recovery of the environment and the Gulf economy has been strong.

Red River Radio
12:55 pm
Fri January 23, 2015

Experts discuss M6 disposal options for Camp Minden

Opponents of a plan to burn 15 million pounds of M6 artillery propellant in storage at Camp Minden say several much safer alternatives should be considered.

State Rep. Gene Reynolds of Minden was among speakers in a teleconference Thursday assembled by the activist group Louisiana Progress Action.

Reynolds is meeting with munitions experts at the Pentagon on Friday. He wants to call a joint meeting of the state’s Homeland Security oversight committee to allow federal and state agencies and the military to testify under oath about the status of the explosives.

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