environment

Community Impact
7:46 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Ora Estuaries Contributes To An Oyster Habitat Restoration Project In St. Bernard Parish

Concrete rings are lowered into the water off the Biloxi Marsh.
Eve Abrams

The Water Challenge seeks to spur innovation in creative water management solutions for the Greater New Orleans region by awarding $50,000 annually through a competitive process. Sponsored by the Greater New Orleans Foundation, the Water Challenge is part of The Idea Village’s New Orleans Entrepreneur Week.

 

 

“This is the southern extent of the Biloxi Marshes,” points Tyler Ortego. “We’re right next to the southern extension of MRGO, less than a mile away. If you see higher vegetation that’s it. The other side of this lake you get out into Breton Sound.”

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Environment
12:41 pm
Sat June 7, 2014

Restoring The Coast By Creating Oyster Beds In St. Bernard Parish

Concrete oyster beds wait to be offloaded into St. Bernard's Lake Athanasio
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

A consortium of environmental and industry stakeholders are making concrete reefs on the Gulf Coast in an attempt to create new oyster habitats. The Lake Athanasio project covers a half a mile of St. Bernard Parish coastline, and seeks to satisfy coastal restoration and commercial interests by giving oysters a sustainable habitat to mature.

Tyler Ortego developed the engineering concept behind the artificial reefs.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Fri June 6, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: James Stram

James Stram.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Latest News
8:02 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Court: BP Must Pay Clean Water Act Fines

Anadarko's holdings in the Gulf of Mexico. The company was a minority partner in the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig disaster.
Credit Anadarko Petroleum Corp.

A federal appeals court says BP PLC and a minority partner in the blown-out Macondo well cannot avoid Clean Water Act fines for the 2010 oil spill by blaming another company's failed equipment.

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Wednesday in an appeal by BP and Anadarko Petroleum Corp. from a 2012 ruling by federal Judge Carl Barbier.

A three-judge panel says the oil came from their well, so they are liable. It said it cannot just blame Transocean's failed blowout preventer.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Thu June 5, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: George Barisich

George Barisich.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Latest News
7:20 am
Wed June 4, 2014

Hollywood South Expanding Clean Energy Options

Hollywood Trucks Ecoluxe trailer is now available for production locations.
Credit Hollywood Trucks

Hollywood South is expanding in a new direction. A new eco-friendly trailer just unveiled in New Orleans is available for A-listers and others involved in the film industry.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Wed June 4, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Greg Miller

Greg Miller.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Tue June 3, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: John Taylor

John Taylor.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp.” Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
9:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?

Destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned the Bayou Bienvenue freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, leaving mostly just open water.
Credit Eve Troeh / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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Five Views On The Future Of New Orleans' Wetlands
7:00 am
Mon June 2, 2014

What To Do With Bayou Bienvenue?: Amanda Moore

Amanda Moore.
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle of today is what is called a “ghost swamp”. Until the 1960s, it was a full of cypress trees, part of the central wetlands system that ran from the Lower 9th Ward all the way to Lake Borgne. But destructive forces — from levee and canal construction to invasive species — turned this freshwater swamp into a saltwater marsh, killing all the cypress trees in the process. You see their dead trunks like scarecrows in the water, and don’t see much else.

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