The state announced on Wednesday that it will divert water from the Mississippi River to rebuild eroding wetlands in Plaquemines Parish.

The Mid-Barataria and Mid-Breton diversions are the first two projects of this scale.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

It turns out Louisiana's climate is a lot like Sub-Saharan Africa's. So it makes some sense you’d see animals usually spotted on safari at Global Wildlife -- an animal refuge on the Northshore in Folsom. There, visitors can learn about 4,000 exotic, endangered and threatened animals from all over the world.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers / http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil

Staving off coastal land loss in Louisiana will take lots of money and lots of manpower. In just the next four years, GNO Inc. expects up to 12,000 new jobs in the so-called “water sector,” like coastal restoration managers and mathematicians who can model water flow.


But there are not enough workers in the region with the skills to fill those jobs. The new University of New Orleans certificate in Coastal Engineering and Science aims to remedy that.

A report released Tuesday says Louisiana is using too much natural gas. The Union of Concerned Scientists rates states based on their reliance on natural gas. Louisiana is among the most at-risk.

Tulane University

A proposal to build a new coal export terminal in Plaquemines Parish has drawn criticism from environmental groups and the public, who say it presents a public health threat. It has been so contentious that the state Department of Natural Resources has faced lawsuits and is currently reviewing its approval of the project after taking input from the public.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

It’s settled – BP has to pay $20 billion for the gulf oil spill in 2010. The deal announced Monday finalizes civil claims and ends five years of legal fighting.

The Department of Justice says BP has to pay Clean Water Act fines and settle with the five gulf states that were impacted - Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The Environmental Protection Agency announced a number of rule changes this week that could have a big impact on industry and quality of life in Louisiana. The new rules cut ozone emissions from 75 parts per billion to 70, and complying might pose a challenge for the state. New Orleans and Baton Rouge are now out of attainment.


The Environmental Protection Agency released new standards on Tuesday for emissions from petroleum refineries.

The EPA says the standards will cut down on CO2 emissions and prevent about 1.4 million people from being exposed to pollutants in the air, like benzene. Regularly breathing such pollutants can cause respiratory problems, increased risk of cancer and other health problems.

Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority / http://cims.coastal.louisiana.gov/FLOODRISK/

Entrepreneurs and businesspeople met at the New Orleans business incubator Propeller on Thursday night to learn about how they can help restore the coast.

U.S. Coast Guard

The National Science Foundation will spend nearly half a million dollars to help a University of New Orleans chemistry professor study sunlight and oil spills. WWNO reporter Tegan Wendland had a conversation with UNO chemistry professor Matthew Tarr.

Tarr wants to better understand how the sun breaks down oil on the water’s surface.