Education

Mallory Falk / WWNO

As New Orleans continues to reshape public education, WWNO seeks to highlight teachers who bring unique talents and perspectives to their work. We feature one such educator each month.

Pablo Garcia teaches standard first grade concepts: addition, subtraction, the water cycle. But he does everything in Spanish. Garcia is an immersion instructor at the International School of Louisiana.

Support for Voices of Educators and education news on WWNO comes from Entergy Corporation.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

This week is the National Week of Action Against School Pushout. Students, teachers and education advocates around the country are holding events to raise awareness about policies they say push kids out of school and into the juvenile justice system. In New Orleans, local groups held a discussion about pushout.

The discussion had a specific focus: the parallel between what's happening in New Orleans schools and what happened this summer in Ferguson, Missouri. 

For 14-year-old Yashua Cantillano, life in New Orleans is an improvement.

But that's not saying much.

Just three months ago, Yashua was in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, dodging gang members. He says they would drive by his school, guns visible, threatening to kill him, his younger brother — Yashua's whole family.

"We'd hide all day," Yashua says, "and that kept us from going to school."

After crossing the U.S. border illegally, he came to New Orleans and ultimately enrolled at Carver Prep, a small charter school on the city's east side.

Alberto G. / Flickr

A few years ago, a new phrase became all the rage in education reform: Data driven. Students take benchmark and standardized tests throughout the year, and the tests generate lots of data. But how do teachers turn those data points into lesson plans?

A new report from Tulane University says New Orleans is improving education at public high schools.

The university’s Cowen Institute says the co-called “vulnerable students” are exceeding expectations.

The study released Wednesday defines those students as:

-- being more than two years above grade-level age in ninth grade

-- having failed an eighth-grade assessment test

-- qualifying for free or reduced-price lunches

-- and being eligible for special education services.

Delgado Community College will be getting $2.5 million for workforce training.

Vice President Joe Biden announced the 270 community colleges across the country that would receive money to train people for jobs expected in their areas.

Delgado will be focusing on energy and advanced manufacturing jobs.

Employers involved in the program include ExxonMobil, Lockheed Martin and Phillips6,

Delgado will offer training programs that meet employer and industry needs. 

A new guide to Louisiana charter school law came out on Friday. It's geared toward a specific group: charter school board members.

The legal handbook is a joint publication from Louisiana Appleseed and the Louisiana Association of Public Charter Schools (LAPCS). It lays out the basics for charter school board members — everything from general responsibilities to legal obligations.

Jason Devaun / Flickr

When schools make budget cuts, art class is usually one of the first things to go. But a new initiative could bring arts education back into New Orleans schools.

New Orleans is now the 16th city to participate in a national program aimed at boosting arts education. The Kennedy Center's Any Given Child program helps K-8 schools come up with long-term plans for arts instruction during the school day.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

It used to be that most kids went to places called schools to get their education, and in those schools, kids were called students. But in recent years, the vocabulary around schooling — especially in urban areas, and especially when it comes to charter schools — is changing. In New Orleans, where all schools receiving public funding are now charters, we investigate what’s behind this new school language.

I started off with a little experiment. I asked a bunch of adults: where did you go to school?

“I went to Newton Elementary School, Newton High School.”

After Katrina, FEMA pledged nearly $2 billion to rebuild New Orleans schools. But that doesn't cover maintenance and repairs. 

Pages