Education

Education
4:45 pm
Mon June 4, 2012

High School Draws Chinese Students, Tuition Dollars

Students from China celebrate the dedication of the Taylor International School and dorm, where they live while attending Lake Shore High School in St. Clair, Mich.
Deb Jacques C&G Newspapers

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 6:52 pm

Lake Shore High School in St. Clair Shores, Mich., is pretty typical as American high schools go. Walking the halls, you find the quiet kids, the jocks and the artsy crowd.

But a visitor will also see what sets Lake Shore apart: The school's large number of exchange students from China. This year, more than 70 Chinese students are enrolled at Lake Shore, which has a total student population of 1,200.

The students are from the Beijing Haidian Foreign Language Experimental School, an elite, private K-12 boarding school in China's capital.

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The Times-Picayune
12:48 pm
Mon June 4, 2012

Loyola University to examine the state of New Orleans media

Larry Lorenz, professor emeritus in the Loyola University New Orleans School of Mass Communication, will examine the ever-changing face of media in New Orleans with "The Press of New Orleans: The Past. The Present. The Future?" on Friday, June 22 at 3:30 p.m.

The seminar will focus on the history of New Orleans' daily newspaper, The Times-Picayune, and discuss its future, in light of the recent announcement that the newspaper will print only three days a week as it shifts to an online media format.

Andre Perry Commentary
5:00 pm
Fri June 1, 2012

14,000

Try to picture 14,000 youth.

Fourteen thousand exceeds the number of registered students at Tulane and the University of New Orleans. It’s a greater number than the combined enrollments of Loyola, Dillard and Xavier Universities. Fourteen thousand youth is about a third of the total number of students that attend public schools in Orleans Parish. The number is approximately 4000 seats shy of a full house at a Hornets game. If a company hired 14,000 youth it would be the largest employer in the city.

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Upward Bound
11:21 am
Fri June 1, 2012

Upward Bound Awards UNO $5M Grant

The University of New Orleans has been awarded grants totaling $5 million over a five-year period by the Upward Bound program through the U. S. Department of Education.

The grants will fund three projects: UNO's Project Pass, UNO's Jefferson Upward Bound and UNO's Classic Upward Bound.

Dropout Rate
11:17 am
Fri June 1, 2012

3 Years of Declining Dropout Rate for Louisiana

BATON ROUGE — Louisiana's Department of Education says the state's annual dropout rate has fallen for three years in a row. A department news release says the percentage of dropouts in seventh- through 12th grades decreased from 3.5 in 2009-2010 to 3.1 in 2010-2011. That means 1,100 more students chose to stay in school. 

Recovery School District
8:30 am
Fri June 1, 2012

BESE reviews capital projects, Early Head Start monitoring

Construction of four new schoolhouses should be completed as classes resume in August, education officials announced Wednesday night, but modular buildings are ready just in case.

Capital projects, including ground-up school construction, highlighted Wednesday night’s meeting in New Orleans of the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education. The board meets periodically in New Orleans — Wednesday’s meeting was at Walter L. Cohen High School — to address Recovery School District issues.

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Education
4:21 am
Thu May 31, 2012

Seattle Area Lacks Computer Science Majors

In Seattle alone, there are thousands of computer-related jobs waiting to be filled. But at the University of Washington, the number of bachelor's degrees in computer science is the same now as it was more than a decade ago. A lot of students have been rebuffed in their effort to major in computer science or computer engineering.

Shots - Health Blog
3:59 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Small Change In Reading To Preschoolers Can Help Disadvantaged Kids Catch Up

Kimberly Payton, a teacher at the Small Savers Child Development Center, reads to a group of preschoolers in Washington, D.C., in 2010. Researchers say that teachers who make small changes in how they read to 4-year-olds can improve kids' reading skills later on.
Ricky Carioti The Washington Post/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 7:45 pm

On a recent Monday morning in Washington, D.C., a group of 3-year-old preschoolers bumbled their way into a circle, more or less, on the rug of their classroom. It was time to read.

The children sat cross-legged as their teacher, Mary-Lynn Goldstein, held high a book, Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus. There was a short conversation about pigeons, then, for reasons that weren't entirely clear, cows; and then Goldstein began to read. She read as most teachers read, occasionally stopping to ask a question, point out a picture or make a comment about the story.

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Education
3:34 am
Tue May 29, 2012

Why Indian Americans Reign As Spelling Bee Champs

Arvind Mahankali, 12, finished third and ninth in the National Spelling Bee in the past two years, and has been stepping up his training, in hopes of finishing first this year. He's even trained his little brother, 8-year-old Srinath, to read phonetics so he can help with the drills.
Tovia Smith NPR

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 12:05 pm

Of the 278 sweaty-palmed students hoping to be crowned champion of this week's 2012 Scripps National Spelling Bee, chances are pretty good that the winner will be of Indian descent. Indian-Americans have won the past four contests, and 9 of the past 13 — even though they make up less than 1 percent of the population.

Over the past decade, South Asians have built a veritable dynasty on the spelling bee circuit; one commentator compared their dominance to Kenyans winning marathons.

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National Teachers Initiative
5:34 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Hard Lessons Follow Rocky Start For Chicago Teacher

Tyrese Graham teaches science at John Marshall Metropolitan High School in Chicago.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:39 am

Tyrese Graham is a second-year science teacher at John Marshall Metropolitan High School on the West Side of Chicago. When he started teaching there, Marshall was among the worst public schools in the city.

When Graham walked into his first class, he could hardly speak over the noise of the students. He tried to make a point by not talking.

"I'll let you finish, but realize, every moment that I'm not talking and providing you instruction, you guys will be giving that back to me," he told them.

Graham's remarks were met with a sharp rebuke from one of his students.

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