Education

The Opinion Page
1:12 pm
Thu January 10, 2013

Op-Ed: To Close The Achievement Gap, Don't Lower The Bar

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 1:12 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Read more
Politics
10:53 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Eyes Glazed? Cutting Through The Fiscal Talks

You might be feeling a bit hung over from all the 'fiscal cliff' negotiations. But the financial talks in Washington aren't over yet. In the coming months, the White House and Congress will face three major economic challenges. Host Michel Martin breaks down what you need to know for the next round of fiscal talks.

Education
2:31 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Elite Colleges Struggle To Recruit Smart, Low-Income Kids

Top schools like Harvard, seen here in 2000, often offer scholarships and other financial incentives, but they are finding it hard to increase the socioeconomic diversity on campus.
Darren McCollester Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 5:26 am

Across the United States, college administrators are poring over student essays, recommendation letters and SAT scores as they select a freshman class for the fall.

If this is like most years, administrators at top schools such as Harvard and Stanford will try hard to find talented high school students from poor families in a push to increase the socioeconomic diversity on campus and to counter the growing concern that highly selective colleges cater mainly to students from privileged backgrounds.

Read more
Education
2:29 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Promoting Hinduism? Parents Demand Removal Of School Yoga Class

Third-graders at Olivenhain Pioneer Elementary School in Encinitas, Calif., perform chair pose with instructor Kristen McCloskey last month.
Kyla Calvert for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 8:46 am

During first period at Olivenhain Pioneer Elementary School in Encinitas, Calif., Kristen McCloskey leads about two dozen third-graders through some familiar yoga poses.

"All right, so let's do our opening sequence A," she says, instructing the kids. "Everyone take a big inhale, lift those arms up. Look up."

At the end of the half-hour class, 8-year-old Jacob Hagen says he feels energized and ready for the rest of the day. "Because you get to stretch out and it's good to be the first class because it wakes you up," he says.

Read more
Education
10:08 am
Tue January 8, 2013

Lessons From 30 Years Of Education Reporting

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, we have a guest who says you don't have to be a baller or a bigshot to invest your money and get a big return. We'll find out how to make the most of a $1,000 investment. That's just ahead in Money Coach.

Read more
Music News
1:03 am
Tue January 8, 2013

2 Pi: Rhymes And Radii

Jake Scott (a.k.a. 2 Pi), with student.
Courtesy of Jake Scott

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 4:29 pm

Read more
Around the Nation
4:19 pm
Mon January 7, 2013

Districts Train Teachers For School Shootings

Firearm instructor Clark Aposhian conducts a concealed-weapons class for teachers, sponsored by the Utah Shooting Sports Council, in West Valley City, Utah. Across the country, school districts and other entities are hoping to better prepare staff to respond in a shooting situation.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 7, 2013 5:19 pm

It's almost instinctive: Teachers want to protect kids in a school shooting. But many don't know how.

So over the holiday break, in the wake of the shooting in Newtown, Conn., several districts around the country conducted school shooter training sessions meant to better prepare staff to respond in the event of a similar crisis. Since last month's attack, drills have been conducted in Nashville, Tenn.; Omaha, Neb.; Utah; and Jefferson County, Ala.

Read more
U.S.
3:10 pm
Thu January 3, 2013

For Many Kids, Winter Break Means Hungry Holidays

Tamara Burney's kindergartners eat lunch in the Hillview Elementary cafeteria in Jefferson County, Ala.
Dan Carsen WBHM

Originally published on Thu January 3, 2013 5:10 pm

Holidays are typically a festive time, with breaks from the routine, meals with loved ones, maybe even some gifts. But for many families across the U.S., the season comes with intense stress: Roughly 1 in 5 families with children are not getting enough food.

For some, free or reduced-price school meals have become a major source of basic nutrition. When schools close for the holidays, many of those families struggle to fill the gap.

Read more
Education
4:10 pm
Wed January 2, 2013

Pa. Governor Sues NCAA Over Penn State Sanctions

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 6:51 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. The governor of Pennsylvania is stepping in on behalf of Penn State University. He's filing an antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA for its sanctions against Penn State. The NCAA had imposed harsh penalties in response to the child sexual abuse case involving the school's former assistant football coach. We'll hear more now from NPR's Tom Goldman.

Read more
Higher Education
1:35 pm
Tue January 1, 2013

Nicholls Upgrades Website Features

Nicholls State University officials say upgrades to the university's website should make it easier for prospective students to apply.

Officials say students can research scholarship information, make formal application for admission to the university and track the process of an application.

More information is available online at www.nicholls.edu/apply.

Pages