education

Legislators are learning the importance of parents helping with their child's schooling through the success of the Louisiana Scholarship Program.

Over 90 percent of parents participating in the Louisiana Scholarship program are pleased with their child's scholarship school.

The program helps children from low-income families choose the school that best fits their needs. President of Louisiana Federation for Children Ann Duplessis says the program also benefits students' personal and social lives. 

For the past 27 years, Young Aspirations/Young Artists — or YAYA — has provided free arts and entrepreneurship classes for young people in New Orleans.

Now the group has a new Arts Center on LaSalle Street in Central City. They celebrated the grand opening on Tuesday.

Until now, YAYA had two studios. One in the Central Business District, the other in Mid-City.

Nearly 9,000 educators from across the country will begin meeting Friday in Orlando, Florida, for the National Education Association’s Representative Assembly. The assembly is the decision-making body for the NEA, which has over three million members.

Special to the Southern Education Desk

Over the last two years, there has been a lot of debate surrounding the Common Core standards throughout the country. But sometimes, all the political noise can make us forget about the main goal of these standards. Do they really do a better job of preparing kids for college and careers? And if not, what’s stopping them?

This week, the Southern Education Desk has been looking at the standards and how they’re being implemented across the South.

Neighborhood Story Project

There’s learning to play music in the school band, and then there’s learning to play music on the street — or the bandstand — from working musicians. In New Orleans, music education has its roots as much outside the classroom as in it.

Ten years ago, Hurricane Katrina ushered in massive change to New Orleans' education system. What lessons have we learned since then? Today the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans (ERA) kicks off a conference trying to answer that question. ERA's director, Douglas Harris, sat down with WWNO's Mallory Falk to discuss how the conference - and his organization - came about.

Support for education reporting on WWNO comes from Baptist Community Ministries and Entergy Corporation.

Cherice Harrison-Nelson

After Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast, all 7,500 employees of the New Orleans school system were fired. That led to an unprecedented diaspora of schoolteachers. New research suggests that only a small fraction of them continue to teach in the city’s schools today.

Girls Rock summer camp participants.
Nina Feldman / WWNO

Let me tell you about this cool, new band. You may not have heard of them yet — they’re called Sorrow Sap. They’re from New Orleans, and they have a fresh new sound… which might be because they started playing together earlier this week.

Oh, and they’re all under the age of 16.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

No matter which era of recent U.S. history we look back on, we seem to be constantly working on two issues: healthcare and education.

The debate at the center of these discussions is often financial. Where is Federal or state money for reform going to come from? And if reform is privately funded, how are these fundamental requirements distributed equally?

Mallory Falk / WWNO

When a school announces it's closing, it doesn't just shut its doors the next day. There's a whole closure process. It's a process Miller McCoy Academy — an all-boys middle and high school — has been following this year. We look inside that process as part of our series "Closing Costs." 

It's a typical weekday morning in the Dean household. 10-year-old William changes out of his pajamas and into his Miller McCoy uniform: white shirt, khaki pants, a blazer and bow tie. He gulps down a bowl of Apple Jacks while his mother Lashunda looks him over.

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