education

Girls Rock summer camp participants.
Nina Feldman / WWNO

Let me tell you about this cool, new band. You may not have heard of them yet — they’re called Sorrow Sap. They’re from New Orleans, and they have a fresh new sound… which might be because they started playing together earlier this week.

Oh, and they’re all under the age of 16.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

No matter which era of recent U.S. history we look back on, we seem to be constantly working on two issues: healthcare and education.

The debate at the center of these discussions is often financial. Where is Federal or state money for reform going to come from? And if reform is privately funded, how are these fundamental requirements distributed equally?

Mallory Falk / WWNO

When a school announces it's closing, it doesn't just shut its doors the next day. There's a whole closure process. It's a process Miller McCoy Academy — an all-boys middle and high school — has been following this year. We look inside that process as part of our series "Closing Costs." 

It's a typical weekday morning in the Dean household. 10-year-old William changes out of his pajamas and into his Miller McCoy uniform: white shirt, khaki pants, a blazer and bow tie. He gulps down a bowl of Apple Jacks while his mother Lashunda looks him over.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Rowan Shafer is a third grade teacher at Morris Jeff Community School. She's committed to teaching a social justice curriculum... which she knows can sound abstract.

"Yeah, those are easy words to say that mean a lot of things," she says.

In this month's Voices of Educators segment, Shafer describes one of her favorite social justice units and explains why, after years of teaching fourth grade, she switched to third.

Do you know a great teacher to include in our series? Send us an email: comments@wwno.org

Mallory Falk / WWNO

When a school shuts down, families have to figure out where to go next.

Anthony Parker faced that decision this year. His son AJ was a kindergartner at Lagniappe Academies, which closed on May 8.

Parker spoke with WWNO Education Reporter Mallory Falk about finding a new school for AJ and shared his advice for other families.

Support for education reporting comes from Bapist Community Ministries and Entergy Corporation

Mallory Falk / WWNO

 

Our series "Closing Costs" follows three New Orleans schools who lost their charters.

At Lagniappe Academies, some administrators tried to hide a lack of services for students with disabilities. The state and Recovery School District chose to close the school, which is a cluster of mobile classrooms in Tremé, rather than find a new operator.

The last day starts off in the cafeteria. Students perform the school chants and cheers one last time.

Pop songs alternate with the chants. Students dance, some with carefully choreographed dance routines.

We are checking back in with a series of conversations about what to do with East Baton Rouge Parish schools.

Anna Fogle is the parent of two kids in the schools and helped organize the Beyond Bricks listening sessions and Rev. Gerard Robinson of McKowen Baptist has been a host for some of them.

They’ll be presenting the results of those conversations at community assemblies over the next several weeks. The schedule is at beyondbricksebr.org.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

The school year is winding down, and for three New Orleans charters, the last day will bring dramatic changes. Two of those schools are closing for good. The third – kindergarten through 8th grade school Andrew H. Wilson Charter – is getting a new operator.

The story of Wilson's future is the first in WWNO's series Closing Costs.

Wilson's contract was up for review this year. The school had to earn a D to get renewed. It missed the grade by less than one point.

New Orleans residents are feeling better about their public schools. A Tulane University report shows 59 percent of those surveyed found the city network of charter schools has improved public education.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Hundreds of graduating high school seniors gathered at Champions Square Friday morning to celebrate their academic success. Officials at the second annual Senior Shout Out hailed the graduation rate of 73 percent – up from 54 percent 10 years ago.

Pages