Mallory Falk / WWNO

As the 10th anniversary of Katrina approaches, many school leaders and policymakers are weighing in on New Orleans' education system. But what about families? At a recent panel, parents took to the stage to reflect on the past 10 years.

Eight parents were featured speakers on the panel. They talked about enrollment, governance and accountability.

lden Richard teaches cybersecurity to a group of educators from around the U.S.

Tuesday was the first day of summer camp at the University of New Orleans, but there will be no letters home to Mom and Dad — this one is a summer camp for teachers. It is the second year of the GenCyber program.

As the 10th anniversary of Katrina approaches, many reporters are looking at post storm progress through the lens of New Orleans' education system. Two recent articles in particular caught WWNO education reporter Mallory Falk's eye. Falk spoke to Danielle Dreilinger of | The Times-Picayune and Emmanuel Felton, a staff writer for The Hechinger Report, about their recent looks into discipline and corruption in New Orleans schools.

Mallory Falk

Of all the changes New Orleans has seen in the ten years since Katrina, the restructuring of the city's public school system is perhaps the most drastic. In place of a traditional school district, most Orleans Parish schools are now governed by a loose confederation of charter operators. What does this new model mean for students, teachers and parents in New Orleans?

Wednesday kicks off late enrollment for most New Orleans public schools.
Mallory Falk / WWNO

Wednesday kicked off late enrollment for most New Orleans public schools. Hundreds of families stopped by Dillard University throughout the day. Some missed earlier deadlines or just moved to the city. Others already got placements but wanted to try for a different school.

Legislators are learning the importance of parents helping with their child's schooling through the success of the Louisiana Scholarship Program.

Over 90 percent of parents participating in the Louisiana Scholarship program are pleased with their child's scholarship school.

The program helps children from low-income families choose the school that best fits their needs. President of Louisiana Federation for Children Ann Duplessis says the program also benefits students' personal and social lives. 

For the past 27 years, Young Aspirations/Young Artists — or YAYA — has provided free arts and entrepreneurship classes for young people in New Orleans.

Now the group has a new Arts Center on LaSalle Street in Central City. They celebrated the grand opening on Tuesday.

Until now, YAYA had two studios. One in the Central Business District, the other in Mid-City.

Nearly 9,000 educators from across the country will begin meeting Friday in Orlando, Florida, for the National Education Association’s Representative Assembly. The assembly is the decision-making body for the NEA, which has over three million members.

Special to the Southern Education Desk

Over the last two years, there has been a lot of debate surrounding the Common Core standards throughout the country. But sometimes, all the political noise can make us forget about the main goal of these standards. Do they really do a better job of preparing kids for college and careers? And if not, what’s stopping them?

This week, the Southern Education Desk has been looking at the standards and how they’re being implemented across the South.

Neighborhood Story Project

There’s learning to play music in the school band, and then there’s learning to play music on the street — or the bandstand — from working musicians. In New Orleans, music education has its roots as much outside the classroom as in it.