education

Xavier University has announced a new program, designed to get more local teachers and teachers of color into charter schools.

The Norman C. Francis Teacher Residency is the first-ever such partnership between charter operators and a historically black university.

Fewer standardized tests and more arts and foreign language. Those are just some of the changes in a draft education plan the state released this week.

Like many states, Louisiana is changing education priorities because now it can. Last year President Obama signed a new education bill into law, replacing No Child Left Behind with the Every Student Succeeds Act. The new law still requires schools to demonstrate how well - or poorly - they're doing. But now states decide how to evaluate and improve schools, rather than the federal government.

Eve Troeh

This week on All Things New Orleans, we get into Cajun country rice fields with Tegan Wendland, for an update on ruined crops after the 2016 Louisiana floods. Public policy lawyer Jeffrey Thomas has made disaster a bigger part of his work after the levee failures of Katrina. He talks about the road ahead for long-term recovery and using federal funds to help flooded communities.

Thousands of Louisiana students are English Language Learners. Many recently came here from Central America, with or without their families. Schools don't always know what they need or are entitled to receive. Now the Southern Poverty Law Center and Louisiana Department of Education are trying to change that.

Things are far from normal for people in Louisiana hit by last month's historic flood. Thousands have lost their homes, their cars, their jobs.

But one routine resumed this week in Baton Rouge: Students are back in class after a three-week interruption.

At Claiborne Elementary in north Baton Rouge, kids are tussling on school playgrounds again, even as their families' soaked belongings lay in heaps along neighborhood streets.

Floods Disrupt Louisiana's School Schedule

Sep 1, 2016

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Louisiana's second-largest school district, all the schools are closed because of the massive flooding there. Students in the East Baton Rouge Parish were scheduled to go back this week. But the district had to delay the start of school until after Labor Day. Mallory Falk from member station WWNO reports.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

The Orleans Parish School Board approved a plan to reunify New Orleans public schools. That is, transfer Recovery School District charters back to the local school board. But this isn’t a return to the old system. It’s a new model for governing schools.

The little Red Hen finds a seed to plant
Florence White Williams - The Little Red Hen: An Old English Folk Tale / Project Gutenberg

With the proliferation of kid’s cookbooks and cooking shows these days, it’s evident that the kitchen is increasingly becoming the favorite playground of many a child. This week’s show is dedicated to the budding chefs of tomorrow and everyone who is young at heart.

A Space for Friendly Ghosts in Store for Big Class

Aug 25, 2016
Big Class
Alex Fischer

Since its start as a first grade project, Big Class has distinguished itself through pizza, poetry and ghostly soirées, all the while staying true to its mission to support young writers through education and collaboration.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

For many local college students, the last few days of August were supposed to be spent moving into dorms. But heavy rains and floods around Baton Rouge have put a hold on those plans.

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