economy

Election 2012
4:28 am
Wed November 7, 2012

Economy Looms Large Over Obama's 2nd Term

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 9:31 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a dive on Wall Street. Just this minute, the Dow Jones Industrial Average is down about 317 points. It's considered the worst drop of the year, so far. We're a little bit before noon in New York City. What's going on? We're going to try to find out. We're joined now by DavidWessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal. And David, as best you can determine, what's driving the drop?

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Election 2012
4:22 am
Wed November 7, 2012

After Election, Congress Turns To 'Fiscal Cliff,' Other Money Issues

If Congress fails to address the alternative minimum tax, millions of households could see their federal 2012 tax bills jump.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed November 7, 2012 9:40 pm

For months, Americans have been watching the presidential political drama play out nightly on the news. Now, with President Obama's victory, that story is ending.

But for the economy, an action thriller is just beginning.

Congress has just weeks to jump to the rescue of an economy moving closer and closer to the so-called fiscal cliff. That phrase refers to a $600 billion cluster of automatic spending cuts and tax hikes — all coming together at year's end.

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Business & Technology
2:08 pm
Tue November 6, 2012

Small Business Conference Thursday At UNO

Chris Genteel, Google's head of diversity markets, and other people from the Internet giant will join bankers, investors and federal officials at the Southeast Louisiana Small Business Conference this Thursday at the UNO Lindy Boggs International Conference Center.

Other speakers include Pellsom Lau, regional manager for the Small Business Administration's office of international trade, and Paul Satenstein, chief financial officer of The Online Incentives Exchange. Satenstein will talk about Louisiana's online exchange for state tax credits.

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Planet Money
4:44 pm
Mon November 5, 2012

Planet Money: After The Flood, The Backup Plan

Food damaged by storm flooding awaits disposal at the Fairway supermarket in Brooklyn.
Seth Wenig Associated Press

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 6:40 pm

A monster storm flooded parts of the biggest city in America this week. Millions of people are still without power.

But in the long run — even in the medium run — New York (and New Jersey!) will recover. And for the U.S. economy as a whole, this disaster will barely be a blip.

This is largely because there are countless backup plans hiding everywhere in our economy. On today's show, a flooded grocery store reveals safety nets that are usually hidden but, at moments like these, are suddenly made visible.

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Intelligence Squared U.S.
5:03 am
Tue October 30, 2012

Are The Rich Taxed Enough?

Panelists Glenn Hubbard (left) and Arthur Laffer argue for the motion "The Rich Are Taxed Enough."
Samuel LaHoz

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 6:07 am

Tax policy has been a divisive theme throughout the presidential campaign. At the core of the debate are divergent philosophies about what the economy needs — and how to get it.

In this Oxford-style debate from Intelligence Squared U.S., a panel of experts dissects the motion "The Rich Are Taxed Enough." The term "enough," in this case, is determined by three factors: fairness, sufficiency and efficiency.

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Planet Money
10:27 am
Fri October 19, 2012

Manufacturing Jobs Aren't Coming Back, No Matter Who's President

St. Louis Fed

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 1:33 pm

The percentage of Americans working in manufacturing fell under President Reagan. It also fell under Presidents Bush, Clinton, Bush and Obama (respectively).

Which is to say, the decline of manufacturing jobs in the U.S. economy is not about who is president or what his policies are. It's the result of long-running, irreversible, historical factors (read: technology and globalization).

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Deceptive Cadence
1:03 am
Thu October 18, 2012

Philadelphia Orchestra Reboots With New Music Director

Yannick Nezet-Seguin leads the Philadelphia Orchestra.
Ryan Donnell

Originally published on Thu October 18, 2012 11:11 am

Everywhere you look right now, it seems like American symphony orchestras are fighting for their lives — strikes, lockouts, bankruptcy. Perhaps the biggest example is the world-renowned Philadelphia Orchestra, which is just coming out of its own bankruptcy. Tonight, its new 37-year-old music director takes the podium as the venerable orchestra begins a reboot.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:06 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

During Lockout Season, Orchestra Musicians Grapple With Their Future

The Minnesota Orchestra is one of many orchestras around the country dealing with labor disputes.
Greg Helgeson

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 12:05 pm

It's been a tumultuous time for American orchestras. Labor disputes have shut down the Minnesota Orchestra and Indianapolis Symphony, and strikes and lockouts have affected orchestras in Chicago, Atlanta and Louisville in the past year.

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The Two-Way
7:14 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Jack Welch Says He Was 'Right About That Strange Jobs Report'

Former General Electric CEO Jack Welch.
Thomas Lohnes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 7:52 am

When former General Electric CEO Jack Welch tweeted on Friday that the drop in the unemployment rate last month was "unbelievable" and that President Obama and his campaign aides "will do anything ... can't debate so change numbers," he aligned himself with conspiracy theorists who were asking if some sort of "October surprise" had been pulled.

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It's All Politics
3:03 pm
Tue October 9, 2012

Study: Unemployment Discussion Differs By Swing State

Job seekers line up to register at a Miami job fair in January. A new study shows that Florida voters discuss joblessness in ways quite different from those in Ohio and Virginia, two other presidential battleground states.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 4:21 pm

Dante Chinni is the director of Patchwork Nation, which uses demographic, voting and cultural data to study communities. It is part of the nonpartisan, not-for-profit Jefferson Institute, which teamed with NPR to examine what can be learned about different communities through online text analysis. The project had Knight Foundation funding.


Since the beginning of the Great Recession, unemployment has driven much of the national conversation, and with good reason.

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