economy

A recent study by the Louisiana Budget Project gives a snapshot of the state’s economy from the perspective of the workers themselves.

The Idea Village

Penny Pritzker, the newly appointed Secretary of Commerce, dropped in on meetings with small business owners at the Idea Village as part of a countrywide listening tour.

Pritzker also brought a big check with her — money destined to help the entrepreneurs the Idea Village serves.

New Orleans Remembers Katrina, 8 Years Later

Aug 29, 2013

More than 1,800 people were killed by Hurricane Katrina and the subsequent floods eight years ago.

New Orleans was one of the hardest-hit places, particularly its Lower Ninth Ward neighborhood, where some of the city’s poorest residents live. It’s still struggling to recover.

But business leaders proudly point to how New Orleans has recently been designated a top boomtown and “aspirational” city in the U.S.

Journalist James O’Byrne says New Orleanians are more optimistic about their city now than they’ve ever been.

A report released Thursday by the Louisiana Budget Project says although worker productivity in the state is at an all-time high, wages remain stagnant and unemployment is on the rise.

New Orleans Index At Eight: Highs And Lows As The City Moves Beyond Rebuilding

Aug 29, 2013
NASA

Before Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed, the Greater New Orleans Community Data Center documented neighborhoods, and tracked social and economic indicators in the city.

The Board of Regents, the state's top higher education panel, is hoping to entice thousands of Louisiana college graduates who left the state to return home and fill what is expected to be a wave of new high-technology jobs.

The initiative, called Operation Recall, will target more than 40,000 people, many of whom have degrees in computer science and engineering.

It’s been eight years this month since Hurricane Katrina. The Greater New Orleans Community Data Center has been measuring data to see how far the recovery has come, and where the city is heading.

Eve Troeh / WWNO

Today is the final day for the LA Swift bus. That’s the commuter bus between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, started shortly after Hurricane Katrina. It has provided transport between the cities for just a few dollars, by far the cheapest option available.

Downtown at Tulane and Loyola Avenues, Carrie Robicheaux waits for the Swift bus back to Baton Rouge, after a trip to see her New Orleans doctor. She’s taken this bus since she moved away after Katrina.

New Orleans tourism officials kicked off a national bus tour scheduled to stop in regions most at risk from climate change. Those officials are linking jobs and coastal restoration.

New Orleans has been judged by Forbes Magazine to be America’s fastest-growing city since 2007. But that distinction may be a bit hard to pinpoint when no other American city was more affected by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

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