Times Picayune archives

When it comes annual rainfall, New Orleans is the third wettest city in the country, next to Pensacola, Florida, and Mobile, Alabama. Historically, this city below sea level has dealt with large amounts of rain by trying to keep as much water out as possible. Now, urban planners, land conservationists and city officials are trying out new strategies to manage water. Keeping more water in, rather than trying to pump it out, may be better for the city than we thought.


Officials are gathering at the old Texaco building on Canal Street Thursday morning to mark its transformation from corporate to residential use. The 17-story tower is now a home for seniors on a low fixed incomes.

djnaquin67 / Flickr

A government watchdog group says New Orleans should sell the World Trade Center that sits empty by the Mississippi River.

The city had reached a tentative lease agreement last year with Gatehouse Capital Corporation to redevelop the old high rise. But negotiations broke off in April, ending plans for the building being converted into a luxury hotel and residential complex.

The Bureau of Governmental Research noted yesterday that it was the third time redevelopment efforts failed.

Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

The State Palace Theater, a piece of New Orleans history, may finally receive a long overdue facelift. Developer Gregor Fox recently announced the purchase of the Canal Street relic for $3.5 million.

The State Palace, built in 1926, was flooded during Hurricane Katrina and fully shut down in 2007. Plans to convert the theater into a museum and concert venue pre-Katrina never happened. Now, Fox says he hopes to complete a partial renovation of the 3,000-seat theater's exterior and adjoining retail space within two years.

Dieter Karner / Wikimedia Commons

A committee evaluating proposals to build a new terminal at Louis Armstrong International Airport is recommending a joint venture composed largely of New Orleans-area businesses.

The New Orleans Advocate reports the recommendation makes Hunt Gibbs Boh Metro the favorite to land the $546.5 million project.

The Shreveport Downtown Development Authority is gearing up for a second Pop UP project.

This time, a vacant, turn-of-the-century building in the central business district will be filled with 6,000 square-feet of retailers that currently don’t have a brick-and-mortar storefront.

Business owners apply to get a rent-free space in the Pop UP. If chosen, they will operate their venture out of the Zodiag building for two weeks, according to Liz Swaine, executive director of the Downtown Development Authority.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

Self-styled "Emperor of the Universe" entertainer Ernie K-Doe used to say that besides New Orleans being the birthplace of jazz, he was pretty sure everything came from New Orleans. When you tell people that grocery giant Whole Foods started here in New Orleans — on Esplanade Avenue — you generally get the same response you'd expect k-Doe would have gotten with his wild claim.

New Orleans is nearing the end of a four-year process to update the master plan for zoning. The new comprehensive plan will update one that has been in place for more than 40 years.

GNO, Inc.

A Chinese company has announced plans to build a methanol manufacturing plant in St. James Parish. It’s the first major investment project by a Chinese company in Louisiana.

New Orleans officials have gotten a look at a new grocery store coming in Central City.

A celebration marked the final roof bracket being installed at the former Myrtle Banks School on Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard.

The first and second floors are being renovated to become the Jack and Jake’s Public Market. The third floor will have offices for non-profits and small businesses involving creative industries.

The building constructed in 1910 was originally the McDonogh 38 school. It closed in 2002 and then was damaged by a fire in 2008.