development

Screen capture from Kickstarter

The Lower 9th Ward Village community center has fallen on tough financial times. Supporters are looking for help in small ways, because big promises of funding have fallen apart.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

There are a lot of people these days claiming how well New Orleans is doing and that in business terms we're now competitive with almost any city in the country. If you'd like proof that this is fact, and not just feel-good boosterism, this edition of Out to Lunch might convince you.

Janaya Williams / WWNO

Cheers and jeers erupted in city council chambers Thursday afternoon as the council voted “yes” to allowing a hotly contested zoning change that will clear the way for a developer, Perez APC, to build a five-story mixed-use residential property on the former site of the Holy Cross School in the Lower 9th Ward.

Neighborhood residents who fought to force the developer to build within current zoning laws left the meeting disappointed and angry. But supporters of the development, like Eric O’Neal Sr., said they were elated that the project would finally be allowed to move forward.

A controversial development proposed for the Holy Cross neighborhood in the Lower 9th Ward heads to the New Orleans City Council later today. Neighbors are fighting a 13-acre development they say threatens riverfront neighborhoods throughout the city.

Wally Gobetz / Flickr

Negotiations between the city of New Orleans and Gatehouse Capital Corporation to redevelop the former World Trade Center have collapsed.

According to a statement released Wednesday by Mayor Mitch Landrieu's administration, the city rejected the developer's final offer to turn the long-derelict high-rise into a W Hotel with rental apartments on the top floor.

The New Orleans Advocate reports the city notified Gatehouse that it was terminating talks in a letter dated April 17.

Battle Brewing In Holy Cross Over Proposed Highrises

Apr 8, 2014
Karen Gadbois / The Lens

The Holy Cross neighborhood is tucked against the levee in the Lower 9th Ward. It takes its name from the historic Holy Cross School, which flooded after Katrina and re-opened in Gentilly, leaving behind a 13-acre campus of rolling fields reaching to the levees, and a vacant administration building with graceful, wrought-iron balconies.

There aren’t a lot of parks in the Lower 9. So the levee is used for exercise, picnicking and relaxing.

The city of Shreveport and the Downtown Development Authority have organized the city’s first Pop UP Project. It aims to give regional businesses a two-week opportunity to have free, storefront real estate in downtown Shreveport. 

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

We talk a lot in New Orleans about the "rebirth" of the city, but before the city was re-born it was born. The architects of what we all agree is our remarkably beautiful city were just that: architects.

Bart Everson

Crews broke ground on the multimillion-dollar Lafitte Greenway Bike and Pedestrian path Tuesday.

The two-and-a-half mile bike and jogging trail is built along an old shipping canal and and connects six historic communities from the French Quarter to City Park. New athletic fields and a tree canopy will line the 12-foot-wide pedestrian trail.

Kenner's efforts to turn its Rivertown district into a focal point for development are getting a boost after the area received an official Main Street designation from the state.

The New Orleans Advocate reports the designation formally places Rivertown among several dozen areas in Louisiana that are part of the national Main Street program, aimed at promoting and reinvigorating urban corridors.

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