development

The Downtown West Monroe Revitalization Group was created by community and business leaders to address development and beautification projects.  

The area includes sites from the Louisville Bridge to the Endom Bridge and several blocks deep to where downtown meets North 3rd Street.  "This area is key to very important to overall development," says DWMR member Courtney Hornsby.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

In business, as in everything else, each generation finds a way to separate itself from the past. One of the interesting current generational shifts is the use of new technology to adapt and carry forward skills developed by previous generations. This group of folks call themselves “Makers.”

Eric Bernstein is a local proponent of the Maker movement and founder of a company called Werkly. And on this show Peter welcomes back one of the grandfathers of the New Orleans economic boom, CEO of the Idea Village, Tim Williamson.

A federal judge says she will not stop construction on a new streetcar line in New Orleans while a group sues for more studies of the project.

The New Orleans Advocate reports that District Judge Nannette Brown says plaintiffs did not offer any evidence that the job involves federal money. That's a key requirement for such a lawsuit.

A local bond issue is paying for the $41.5 million North Rampart Street line.

Industrial Development Board for the city of New Orleans has approved tax breaks worth at least $3.1 million for a proposed $63.5 million movie studio complex.

If completed, the Deep South Studios complex would be one of the biggest investments in the local film industry to date.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

 

Nearly ten years after Hurricane Katrina, some former school buildings sit vacant. The school board is selling them off. This week charter school leaders get a look inside seven of the buildings.

The buildings are mostly empty: a faded mural here, a line of rusted lockers there. State law gives charter school operators first dibs on the buildings. So the seven properties are on display, but not to the general public.

drp / Flickr

Neighborhood groups came out strongly on Tuesday against a massive overhaul of the codes governing new development in New Orleans, setting the stage for fights over new condominiums along the Mississippi River, the spread of live music into quiet neighborhoods and the delicate balance between economic growth and residents' wishes.

The groups paid for a new billboard near City Hall calling on city leaders to "Fix the CZO!," a reference to the new 600-plus page comprehensive zoning ordinance under review. The City Council is expected to adopt the new codes this year.

Gwen Hamilton was involved in forming the East Baton Rouge Redevelopment Authority. She was recently called back in as its interim CEO.

She talks a lot about “transformative change” — the sort of change you can’t help but notice.


The state's largest utility needs to come up with more power before the end of 2016.

And it needs to find even more by the end of 2019 to meet the demands of Louisiana's ongoing industrial boom.

That likely means building power plants for about $1 billion a piece. The 1 million customers of Entergy’s Louisiana companies will be expected to pay.

The Advocate reports Entergy is spending a couple of billion dollars over the next few years to move huge amounts of electricity to where the new manufacturing facilities will be located.

Sarah Decristofaro / New Orleans BioInnovation Center

James Carville was the closing speaker Wednesday afternoon at the Forward Cities Initiative convention for innovation leaders from four cities.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

There’s a new push to get tourists in New Orleans off Bourbon Street and into nature. Eco-tourism is the new way to explore Louisiana, according to a new statewide campaign. And as commercial fishermen are seeing numbers drop in catch and profit, they’re considering the tourism industry as a way to make a living.  

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