criminal justice

Courtesy of StoryCorps

As part of our Storycorps series on criminal justice, we bring you a story about re-adjusting to life on the outside.

Kenneth Dilosa, Tyronne Smith, and Ben Smith helped found a reentry organization called "The First 72+". Located in the shadow of the new jail, it was created by formerly incarcerated people to help others transition out of prison and build for the future. Their motto is: "us helping us".

Courtesy of StoryCorps

As part of our StoryCorps series on criminal justice, we bring you this conversation between two young attorneys.

William Snowden and Barksdale Hortenstine met through their job at Orleans Public Defenders. They're both in their 30's. Barksdale is white; William is not. They talk about implicit bias and how it relates to the criminal justice system.

Bring Your Own Presents: Leroy's Mission

Oct 5, 2016
Claire Bangser / Bring Your Own

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

This story was told on March 3rd, 2016 at the Michalopolous Studio at a Bring Your Own event in partnership Unprisoned.  The story was later produced by Natalie Yahr. The theme of the evening was "Born on Parole". Here, Leroy Perry tells of the lengths he went to prove his innocence, and what he learned along the way.  

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

CourtWatch NOLA  has been gathering data on the Orleans Parish criminal justice system. The group found problems that include locking up poor people for failing to pay fines, and widely varying sentences.

Bruce Reilly

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

This story was told on March 3rd, 2016 at the Michalopoulos Studio, and later produced by Laine Kaplan-Levenson. The theme of the evening was 'Born on Parole' and Bruce Reilly talks the trials and tribulations of dating, while on Parole.

15-year-old Jewel Williams, in Sunny Summer's third period English class at Sci High.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Over the last forty years, as incarceration has surged across the nation, so has the number of children with a family member in prison. According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the number of young people with a father in prison rose 500 percent between 1980 and 2000.


Louisiana's hate-crime protections now cover law enforcement and first responders. Gov. John Bel Edwards signed the legislation on Thursday after it had passed easily in the Republican-controlled Legislature, NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards at the rally at the Capitol on Youth Justice Day.
Sarah Hunt / Louisiana Center for Children's Rights

At all levels of government right now, laws about juveniles are rapidly changing. However, some states, including Louisiana, continue to prosecute and sentence juveniles for sentences of life without parole.

Asha Lane, high school senior.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Asha Lane is an 18-year-old senior at the International High School of New Orleans, a charter high school. Asha wanted to find out why New Orleans charter schools don’t always feel nurturing. We live in a dangerous city, but when does security feel unsafe?

A nonprofit monitoring New Orleans courts says that more than 10 years after Hurricane Katrina destroyed evidence kept in a basement that flooded, evidence remains at risk. It’s recommending alternative storage be used, and other improvements inside courtrooms are needed.

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