JBrazito / Flickr

Ten people were wounded in a shooting early Sunday morning on Bourbon Street. One of the victims remains in critical condition, four others are hospitalized in stable condition.

A high-definition, robotic camera on the balcony of a popular karaoke bar called the Cat’s Meow caught it all on tape: First, total chaos, then bystanders rushing in to help the victims.

New Orleans police are still searching for two men who exchanged gunfire on Bourbon Street in the French Quarter.

Nine people were shot in the crossfire, including two who are in critical condition.

Images captured from a surveillance camera above a bar showed people running down the street in the chaos of the shooting at 2:45 a.m. Sunday.

New Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas said six victims were hospitalized in stable condition. 

The other victim's condition wasn't available. Some of them were tourists. Their names weren't immediately released.

New Orleans police are investigating a shooting on Bourbon Street that injured nine people, two critically. Two men opened fire, injuring bystanders.

New Orleans Police Superintendent Ronal Serpas says three officers were patrolling the area when gunfire erupted early Sunday morning.

He says it started with two men arguing, then opening fire. He says eyewitnesses are being interviewed and video surveillance tapes are being reviewed. The shooting was only a few blocks from Jackson Square and among several popular bars on the crowded street.

Derek Bridges / Flickr

Former New Orleans City Councilwoman Renee Gill Pratt has gotten a reprieve — at least for now — on reporting to prison for a racketeering conviction.

A federal judge has agreed to look into whether jurors in her 2011 trial were affected by a prosecutor's anonymous online remarks.

Pratt was convicted in a plot to steal more than $1 million from taxpayer-funded charities.

She is among the federal defendants claiming their cases were tainted by the online comments of former Assistant U.S. Attorney Sal Perricone.

Derek Bridges

Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin has been granted a delay in sentencing on federal corruption charges.

U.S. District Judge Helen Berrigan on Thursday set Nagin's sentencing hearing for July 2.

The hearing had been set for June 11.

Nagin's lawyer said he needed more time to respond to a lengthy pre-sentence investigation report filed earlier this month.

Prosecutors had opposed a delay, saying there has been plenty of time to prepare for the hearing.

Clint Durrett /

A federal judge is ordering former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin to pay the government more than a half-million dollars, stemming from his corruption conviction. The order comes ahead of his sentencing set for next month.


Flicking a cigarette butt out of your car window could get you slapped with a hefty fine and community service.

Gov. Bobby Jindal has signed into law a bill that labels cigarette butts as litter and allows the fines.

The measure by Republican Rep. Patrick Connick, from Marrero, carries a first offense fine of $300 and eight hours of community service in a litter cleanup program.

In the next installment of an NPR investigation, Joseph Shapiro goes to New Orleans to look at the ways poor people are charged for their public defender in court.

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Jesse Hardman

A year ago this week, the City of New Orleans was reeling — at a second line, on Mother’s Day, shots were fired into the crowd, striking 19 people. Another was trampled in the chaos.

Today on All Things New Orleans, we explore some issues brought about by the Mother’s Day shooting. We hear from one person shot at the second line, and his thoughts on any type of justice that might come from such an event.

New Orleans District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro explains a new approach to prosecuting violent crime.

New Orleans is making progress toward losing the "murder capital" label. For a second straight year, homicides declined in the city, in keeping with a nationwide trend.

For African-Americans in the city, though, the numbers are less comforting. Of the nearly 350 killings in the past two years, 91 percent of the victims have been black. It's a cycle that's worrisome to the city's African-American community — and law enforcement.