confederate monuments

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A third confederate monument in New Orleans was removed in the middle of the night. The statue of P.G.T. Beauregard that once stood at the entrance to New Orleans’ City Park is now gone.

It took almost 7 hours for workers to strap the statue of confederate general PGT Beauregard and his horse to a crane and lift it onto a flatbed truck. Karen Murray was there in protest. She wiped away angry tears as she watched workers set up in the dark.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The fight to preserve one of three Confederate monuments set for removal is heading back to court.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A second line parade took place on Sunday afternoon, May 8th in New Orleans to celebrate the removal of four of the city’s confederate monuments. The first confederate monument was removed in the early hours of April 24th. Three more are slated for removal. Those celebrating the removal of the monuments were met by protesters who oppose the removal process. Three people were arrested. 

The organizing group Take Em’ Down Nola held a parade to ‘bury white supremacy.’ Co-founder Malcolm Suber addressed the crowd.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

A bill that provides for the conservation of public military memorials passed a state house committee this morning. The simple language of House Bill 71 doesn’t mention the word ‘confederate’, but it has everything to do with preserving the three remaining monuments that are slated for removal. Testimonies for and against State representative Thomas Carmody’s bill were directly related to the status of the PT Beauregard, Robert E Lee, and Jefferson Davis statues.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

New Orleans has taken down one of the four confederate monuments slated for removal. Last night, protestors and counter protesters clashed at the Jefferson Davis monument in Mid City. 

A small group protesting the removal of the monuments stood guard over a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. They lit candles and waved confederate flags. Some were armed with assault weapons. A crowd of over 200 counter protesters joined the demonstration yelling ‘take ‘em down.’

Karen Alesich watched the scene from across the street as tensions rose.

Thomas Walsh

The Monumental Task Committee, a volunteer organization that looks after New Orleans monuments, is hosting a public forum on Tuesday, August 25, 2015. The goal is to discuss the fate of four Confederate-themed statues.

The debate on whether New Orleans should continue hosting depictions of General Robert E. Lee and other Civil War Confederate heroes started in June, after the racially charged shooting of eight black parishioners at a church in Charleston, South Carolina. That state decided to stop flying the Confederate flag at the state capital. And soon after Mayor Landrieu opened a dialogue on his city’s use of Confederate symbols, namely a series of statues.