community activism

The Black Panthers And A Community Named Desire

Apr 19, 2018
The Historic New Orleans Collection

On September 15 of 1970, rising tensions between the New Orleans Police and the Black Panther Party came to a head in a 20-minute shootout. The police arrived at the Desire public housing development armed in a war wagon to evict the Panthers. Malik Rahim was there. In this edition of NOLA Life Stories, Malik speaks about how he joined the Panthers and remembers the showdown in Desire.  

Nola to Angola

On Saturday, April 7, Nola to Angola is hosting an 8-mile bike ride and cookout for prison justice. In addition to raising money for four local nonprofits, the ride's goal is to raise awareness about mass incarceration in Louisiana. 

Congreso de Jornaleros

There are scores of religious sanctuaries in New Orleans. First Grace United Methodist Church, located in Mid-City, has one thing on all the others, though. It’s a real-life sanctuary to a man named Jose Torres.

Confetti Kids

Local filmmaker Russell Blanchard has proof that change can begin in your own backyard. His award-winning film, 'The Lot' tells the story of a West Bank neighborhood coming together after Hurricane Katrina, and now, the film has started a community movement of its own. NolaVie’s Brian Friedman speaks with Russell to learn more.

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Brian Friedman.

Kelley Crawford / NolaVie

Often when we think about architecture, we think about walls, structures, and enclosed spaces. But Bryan C. Lee, Jr, an architect and educator, goes beyond these boundaries by bringing in knowledge from the environment and community around him. NolaVie’s Kelley Crawford spoke with Bryan about designing for social justice and his new course at Bard Early College in New Orleans.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.
 

Laine Kaplan-Levenson

The Episcopal Church of Louisiana spent the past year making plans for a new ministry, aiming to address its history of racism, as well as other forms of racism in society.

Last week, the Washington, D.C.-based leader of the Episcopal Church came to New Orleans for a special service. At Christ Church Cathedral, the oldest Episcopal congregation in New Orleans, worshippers committed to racial healing and racial justice.