community

Jason Saul / WWNO

New Orleans is a city of desperate violence, but those neighborhoods most plagued by a wanton disregard for life — parts of Central City, say, or New Orleans East — seem a world away from the neon and wrought iron of the French Quarter.

However, a near-daily litany of burglaries, batteries and robberies filling the police blotter now has many French Quarter locals scared, and they are sharing that fear with visitors.

Jesse Kunerth / Shutterstock

 

Last month the Southern Poverty Law Center, Louisiana Department of Education, State School Board, and Orleans Parish School Board reached a settlement on a four-year-old lawsuit. The suit claimed New Orleans schools weren't effectively serving students with disabilities — something that's harder to monitor and track in the charter school landscape.

Frustration was the general message at a Central City meeting with residents and federal monitors reviewing reforms at the New Orleans Police Department. Most of the speakers say the process is too slow.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Homelessness is a big issue in the New Orleans region, one that extends to the Northshore. Winter is particularly hard — shelters fill up, it is cold, and there is often nowhere to go. It can be especially hard for single men, and one organization is Slidell is trying to help.

Mark McVille has been homeless for two years. He has worked as a tugboat captain and construction worker, and was in the army for a while. He always had a pretty good job and had no problem supporting his kids.

Activists calling for an immediate safe disposal of M6 explosives at Camp Minden in Webster Parish lodged an official complaint with the state Wednesday.

A group delivered more than 3,600 signatures to the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality’s Northwest Regional office in Shreveport. They also delivered copies to the local offices of Louisiana’s congressional delegation.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

WWNO's Listening Post project asks questions about local news in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast and reports back on the community's response. This week the Listening Post explores homelessness in New Orleans. Where did you sleep last night?

Last June, First Lady Michelle Obama announced an initiative to end veteran homelessness by the end of 2015. 

It’s been five years since the Supreme Court ruling on the Citizens United case that allowed corporations to greatly increase their political spending. A grassroots movement is forming in New Orleans to reverse the decision.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

An organization in Covington is doing what it can to help families of children with disabilities.

Northshore Families Helping Families is a family-driven resource center that provides information and referrals for families along the Northshore. One of their key events is called “Touch a Truck.” It’s a fundraiser for the organization, but also an opportunity for kids to interact with law enforcement and have fun.

This month, as high school seniors apply for financial aid, we focus our Voices of Educators series on a college counselor.

Sheena Reed is Director of College Counseling at Sci Academy. She draws on her own experiences - as a first generation college student and college admissions officer — to guide her students.

Do you know a great teacher to include in our Voices of Educators series? Send us an email: comments@wwno.org

Support for Voices of Educators and education news on WWNO comes from Entergy Corporation.

shannonpatrick17 / Wikimedia Commons

Activists are gathering on Freret Street Tuesday night as part of a national day of action against the creation of the Keystone XL pipeline. 350 Louisiana, the Sierra Club, the Louisiana Bucket Brigade and other groups are coming together to ask President Obama to keep his promise to veto the pipeline.

The event is called a "projector action." Organizers will project images of Keystone and its consequences against the sides of buildings on Freret and Cadiz streets starting at 7:30 p.m.

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