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Doug Niolet was a seasoned Hurricane Hunter for the Air Force Reserve. So of course, when Hurricane Katrina approached the Gulf Coast ten years ago, he had no plans to evacuate.


Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Activists from across the country have converged in New Orleans for a week of activism and organizing.

Hundreds of people from about 30 activist groups are gathering at Congo Square in Louis Armstrong Park this week to draw attention to their belief that the city has not bounced back from the social and structural damage that resulted from Hurricane Katrina.

This is the long story of a short street: Schnell Drive, two blocks of brick homes in Arabi, La., just east of New Orleans in St. Bernard Parish.

When we first visited in the fall of 2005, Donald and Colleen Bordelon were often the only two people on Schnell Drive. They had stayed in their home through the storm and the flood, and through the weeks after when the first floor was still filled with water.

Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans today is smaller than when the storm hit, with 110,000 fewer people than the nearly half-million who had lived there. But the city's recovery is a story that varies with each neighborhood. In some neighborhoods, like the Lower Ninth Ward, many residents never returned. Others, like the French Quarter, have seen many newcomers and now have more households than they did in 2005.

Donna Landry, executive director of the Richard Murphy Hospice House, and staff member Darick Selders, work to make patients comfortable during their last days of life.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

On a quiet little cul-de-sac in Hammond, there is a special place where people go to die. The Richard Murphy Hospice House offers an alternative to the clinical setting of a nursing home for people during their last days of life.

It's back to school season. And in New Orleans, it truly is a season — spanning late July to late August. The city has many school start dates and calendars.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

School is back in session. And there's a new option for students with severe mental and behavioral health needs: the New Orleans Therapeutic Day Program. The program recently held a ribbon cutting ceremony.

Thomas Walsh

The Monumental Task Committee, a volunteer organization that looks after New Orleans monuments, is hosting a public forum on Tuesday, August 25, 2015. The goal is to discuss the fate of four Confederate-themed statues.

The debate on whether New Orleans should continue hosting depictions of General Robert E. Lee and other Civil War Confederate heroes started in June, after the racially charged shooting of eight black parishioners at a church in Charleston, South Carolina. That state decided to stop flying the Confederate flag at the state capital. And soon after Mayor Landrieu opened a dialogue on his city’s use of Confederate symbols, namely a series of statues.

Angela Chalk lives right in the middle of New Orleans, in the 7th Ward. Her house withstood Hurricane Katrina's pounding winds, but not the flood that followed when the federal levee system failed.

"I had 6 feet of water," she says, pointing to a watermark on her wall.

And she wasn't alone. About 80 percent of the city's homes were inundated with floodwater. It was weeks before the water receded and Chalk was able to return home.

When she did, what she found was a crusty brown mess.

After the levees broke 10 years ago in New Orleans, tens of thousands of residents fled the city and never returned. They resettled in 32 states around the nation, many of them landing in Houston.

New Home Family Worship Center also relocated to that city and became the spiritual family for a dislocated and homesick congregation. Most of the people who came to a special worship service Thursday night were born in New Orleans. With "Katrina 10" projected on the screen behind the altar, Pastor Robert C. Blakes introduced his special guest.

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