community

Historic New Orleans City

It’s estimated that local non-profits have annual expenditures of over $550 million and must rely on government subsidies, fundraising campaigns and grant proposals to complete their missions. Philanthropic groups, like the Joe W. and Dorothy Dorsett Brown Foundation, develop their own mission statements to support those institutions and spend the year deciding where to allocate funds.

The annual meeting of the Greater New Orleans, Incorporated business development group is normally a chance to reflect on success stories and progress. This year’s gathering had a twist, coming by chance on the day after a disappointing budget special session by the state legislature.

The diversity of the Gulf will be one of the topics at Slow Fish, an international conference in New Orleans this week.
Slow Fish

Update: Friday's Slow Fish program will be at The Broad Theater at 636 N. Broad Street. Conference only, no public festival.

The Slow Fish conference is March 10-13 at the Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave.

Its festival is held around the grounds and is free and open to the public on Friday (March 11), 3-7 p.m., Saturday (March 12), noon-6 p.m. 

See details at www.slowfish2016.com.

Bring Your Own and Unprisoned Present: 'Pig Tales'

Mar 10, 2016
Claire Bangser / Bring Your Own

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

The New Orleans Inspector General says in a new report that about half of the Sewerage and Water Board accounts are delinquent. The overdue accounts amount to more than $10 million.

Troylynn Robertson and Kortney Williams.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Louisiana is the incarceration capital of the world. That means more families have a loved one behind bars than in any other place.

Santos Alvarado at a demonstration in front of City Hall last summer.
Fernando Lopez

New Orleans is officially a Welcoming City for immigrants. That’s because last September the City Council passed an ordinance to that effect, as part of a national initiative. But what does that actually mean? Now, four months after the resolution was passed, the City has taken some small but meaningful steps to make New Orleans feel like home for immigrants.

Reuben Cain and son.
Eve Abrams / Unprisoned

The way our criminal justice system works, there’s a significant cost to just being accused of a crime. Innocent or not, one way or another, you still have to pay. Especially if you have a past.

When you enter the lobby of the Orleans Public Defender's Office, expect a bit of a wait, because receptionist Chastity Tillman will likely be busy on the phone.

"The jail calls. We get them every second," Tillman says.

An inmate in the new Orleans Parish Prison.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

The Listening Post is teaming up with the Unprisoned project, a new media initiative by award winning independent radio producer Eve Abrams. We want to understand better how jails and prisons impact society here in Louisiana, where 1 in 75 residents are incarcerated, the highest rate in the world.

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