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What do you do when you see an unfamiliar face? The more I get around Louisiana, the more I think the answer is, you stuff it.

Volunteers help a group of children on a field trip make prints of local fish at the Northlake Nature Center.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

With thousands of acres of wildlife refuges along Lake Pontchartrain and the Bogue Chitto River, the Northshore is known for its natural beauty.

The volunteers at one small park near Mandeville are working to provide opportunities for people to get involved and develop a deeper understanding of the local ecosystem. At the Northlake Nature Center, that appreciation begins with children.

Alexandra Garreton

According to numbers from the US Census and the IRS, 236,970 people left Louisiana between the summer of 2005 and the summer of 2006, mostly because of Hurricane Katrina.

Census details can’t tell who is a former resident returning and who’s new, but as of last year, the state had only recovered about 100,000 people, less than half of those who left. Whether it's abandoned houses or empty chairs at the dinner table, New Orleans is rebuilding around a conspicuous absence.

This week on The Debris, stories of people and things missing from, and just missing, New Orleans.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

As the 10th anniversary of Katrina approaches, many school leaders and policymakers are weighing in on New Orleans' education system. But what about families? At a recent panel, parents took to the stage to reflect on the past 10 years.

Eight parents were featured speakers on the panel. They talked about enrollment, governance and accountability.

Eve Abrams

Ten years after New Orleans flooded following Hurricane Katrina, the city has regained roughly 79 percent of its population. But that doesn’t mean it has 79 percent of the same people.

Much has changed about where New Orleanians live, but one of the biggest is that 97,000 fewer black people live in Orleans Parish than before the storm. It’s hard to pin down exactly where everyone went, but you can get a glimpse of why on one particular street corner. Eve Abrams investigats how who gets on the Megabus tells the story of New Orleans’ diaspora.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

St. Tammany Parish has one of the highest rates of suicide in the state. It’s a problem that advocates are trying to solve and officials are trying to understand.

St. Tammany Outreach for the Prevention of Suicide, or STOPS, is determined to get the community talking about this problem, and to help those impacted. The 46 suicides in St Tammany Parish last year was a new record. But it’s an old problem. Parish resident Ricky Bryant is part of a long list that stretches back a few decades.

There’s a new report from the Data Center on New Orleans 10 years after Hurricane Katrina.

This one focuses on new Latino immigrants who arrived to work in the area, nearly doubling the number of Latino residents in the region. 

Report co-author Lucas Diaz of Tulane University says the city needs policies to help the new residents feel welcome.

He says those policies should include having bilingual services.

For the past 27 years, Young Aspirations/Young Artists — or YAYA — has provided free arts and entrepreneurship classes for young people in New Orleans.

Now the group has a new Arts Center on LaSalle Street in Central City. They celebrated the grand opening on Tuesday.

Until now, YAYA had two studios. One in the Central Business District, the other in Mid-City.

Glenn Ford, the Shreveport man exonerated last year after spending 30 years on death row, died yesterday.

Ford was 33 years old when he was wrongfully convicted of killing a Shreveport jeweler and sent to solitary confinement on death row at the Louisiana State Penitentiary. Nearly three decades later, the longest-serving death row inmate in the country was released.

Ford petitioned the state for compensation for his wrongful conviction. He received only $20 for a bus ride.

LACCR

The Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights defends the right of every Louisiana child to fairness, dignity and opportunity. Their holistic defense helps young people achieve their legal and life goals.

Ariel Test is an attorney for the Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights. Her and her team defends the vast majority of kids arrested in Orleans Parish.

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