The Listening Post is back collecting thoughts and experiences from communities around New Orleans on a new series of issues. The past month we’ve been collaborating with Independent radio producer Eve Abrams and her Unprisoned project. 

The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Mr. David D. Plater [2003.0083.2.1]

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a two-part series on highways. The first looks at a controversy so intense, it’s called the ‘Second Battle of New Orleans.’

Photo by Pat Jolly, courtesy New Orleans Musicians' Clinic

Community Impact is WWNO's series on nonprofit organizations in the New Orleans region, a partnership between WWNO and the Greater New Orleans Foundation. In this edition Jasmin Lopez visits the New Orleans Musicians' Clinic.

Jahi Salaam
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

“If you grew up struggling, then you my audience,” says Jahi Salaam, an 18-year-old rapper and a poet. Jahi is from New Orleans. His first name, Jahi, means dignity in Swahili. His last name means peace. When Jahi talks about poverty, school, and prison, he says: they’re all intertwined.

This is Unprisoned.  I’m Eve Abrams.

Photo courtesy of Eden House

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, the average age of entry into prostitution in the United States is 12-14.

Eden House is a two-year residential program for women who have been commercially and sexually exploited. Modeled after Magdalene House in Nashville, Tennessee, Eden House provides six to eight women a safe and supportive home for two years, free of cost.

Outside the Wire productions

    A performance is planned at Tulane University this week that brings ancient Greek tragedy to modern-day veterans. Eileen Fleming reports it’s also a public health project.

The University of New Orleans quality of life survey shows Orleans Parish residents aren’t as optimistic as they had been about the city’s future. Jefferson Parish respondents remain much more satisfied with their community.

Touro Synagogue

We are all living with mass incarceration one way or another. It affects everyone, passively or actively.

I was recently sitting in the beautiful sanctuary of Touro Synagogue in Uptown New Orleans. It was Yom Kippur, and when I looked down at the holiday bulletin, there was a posting — about mass incarceration. It was an invitation to learn about the issue.

Housing advocates have been holding an all-night vigil in front of offices of the Housing Authority of New Orleans. It’s designed to press the authority for more reforms than are planned for review later today.

Women With A Vision 'Do The Work Alongside Our Community'

Mar 23, 2016
Women With a Vision

One of the mottos knocked around the offices of Women With A Vision is “We serve at the feet of those who suffer the most.” For 25 years they've worked with African American women, the LGBTQ community, and other people living in harmful situations to help them with advocacy, supportive services and community-based participatory research.