community

Police responded to Baton Rouge street protests en masse on July 10.
Bryan Tarnowski

This story is being continuously updated.

Protests continued in Baton Rouge Sunday evening, six days after the shooting death of Alton Sterling by a Baton Rouge police officer.

Large crowds of protestors collected in several different areas of the city, met by police in riot gear. At least 50 people were arrested.

With reporting from Baton Rouge by Jesse Hardman, Tegan Wendland and Bryan Tarnowski.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

About 100 people marched along St. Claude Avenue in New Orleans on Sunday in protest of police shootings and street violence.  

The killing of Alton Sterling, 37, by police earlier this week touched off protests across the country – but in Sterling's home city of Baton Rouge, La., demonstrators' outrage has rarely exceeded a parboil. And that's by design.

Baton Rouge, La., gathered for the third night in a row to remember Alton Sterling.

Sterling was shot by police on Tuesday; video posted that night showed he was lying on the ground when police pulled their weapons. The local community quickly took to the streets in protest.

On Wednesday, as the story gained national traction, a second photo was posted online, showing the shooting from closer range. On Wednesday night, The Associated Press reports, people gathered in prayer and anger to remember Sterling and protest his death.

Calvin Manny Hills and his oldest sister, Johnnie Mae Hills Sylve, get together for a Father's Day party.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

In nearly every state, prison populations have exploded -- in large part, because of drug laws and the people, like Manny Hills, who are arrested and incarcerated for those laws. Over the last 25 years, Manny, an addict, has been convicted several times for drug possession and other petty crimes. His story is pretty typical of the people who fill up our nation's prisons.

When it comes to child well-being in the U.S., Louisiana ranks near the bottom: 48th. That's according to a new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The results of the annual report are, sadly, not shocking. "We have historically always ranked at least in the bottom five states in overall child well-being, so unfortunately that wasn't a big surprise," says Teresa Falgoust. She's with Agenda for Children, which contributed local data to the national report. It looks at trends in data between 2008 and 2014.

Erin Krall / WWNO

New Orleans police are cutting back on night hours at district stations. Officials are also setting up community outreach meetings for feedback on department operations.

"The bomb," a sepecialty po-boy at Guy's Po-Boys in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Guy’s Po-boys was closed for months earlier this year after a vehicle plowed through its front door late one night. Guy’s is back open now, but a group of fellow po-boy purveyors decided to hold a fundraiser to support its proprietor after losing out on so much business during the repairs. It will be a street party with a purpose, powered by po-boys.

See details below:

Host Poppy Tooker with NPR's Kitchen Sisters Davia Nelson, left, and Nikki Silva, right.
Joe Shriner

On this week's show, we take a journey in sound with two radio luminaries, Davia Nelson and Nikki Silva, also known as The Kitchen Sisters.

Davia and Nikki visit our kitchen at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum to discuss their amazing trajectory on NPR as well as how they came to uncover Hidden Kitchens, their duPont-Columbia Award-winning series.

15-year-old Jewel Williams, in Sunny Summer's third period English class at Sci High.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Over the last forty years, as incarceration has surged across the nation, so has the number of children with a family member in prison. According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the number of young people with a father in prison rose 500 percent between 1980 and 2000.


Pages